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The Whole Wide World
(1996)
Album Cover Art
Produced, Orchestrated, Arranged, and Co-Produced by:

Co-Produced by:
Slamm Andrews

Consultation by:
Hans Zimmer
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Mojo Music Inc/Mojotrax
(February 5th, 1997)
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ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release but completely out of print within a few years. It became very difficult to find thereafter, with copies reportedly selling for as much as $75 in the 2000's.
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AWARDS
None.
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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you are not bothered by romantic compositions that require strong orchestral performances to take flight but are instead electronically rendered, draining them of nearly all their potential impact.

Avoid it... if you expect to actually hear Hans Zimmer music as advertised or if you prefer a collaboration with Harry Gregson-Williams that produces something as consistent in its flow as Smilla's Sense of Snow.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #951
WRITTEN 7/17/04, REVISED 9/29/11
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Gregson-<br>Williams
Gregson-
Williams
Zimmer
Zimmer
The Whole Wide World: (Harry Gregson-Williams) Robert E. Howard was one of the more inspired fantasy writers of a generation, conjuring such famous serial characters as Conan the Barbarian, Kull the Conquerer, and Red Sonja. His youthful, platonic relationship with writer Novalyne Price Ellis is the subject of the story for the 1996 movie The Whole Wide World, with the three-year friendship between writers recalled many decades later by the still-living Ellis. The tumultuous but undeniably sweet relationship between the two was strained if only because Ellis enjoyed writing about naturalistic topics while Howard was obnoxiously stuck in the imaginary land of Conan. Ellis' book of romantic recollection, "One Who Walked Alone," was several years in the translation to the big screen, and while embraced with critical success (especially in response to a strong early performance by actress Renee Zellweger) at the time of its release, The Whole Wide World was actually seen by very few people. Director Dan Ireland asked his friend and collaborator Hans Zimmer to compose the music for film, and although Zimmer accepted the assignment, he introduced Harry Gregson-Williams as the artist would actually compose the music for the film. Gregson-Williams was mainly an arranger who was quickly rising up the ranks of Media Ventures artists (much like Nick Glennie-Smith at the time) and doing much of the ghostwriting duties for Zimmer in the Oscar-winner's early collaborative days. The intriguing aspect of The Whole Wide World is that unlike other Zimmer co-credited projects in which the better known composer writes a theme or a cue or two, Zimmer did nothing for The Whole Wide World. As Gregson-Williams said back at the time of the film's release, "Hans didn't write any music for The Whole Wide World. In fact, he heard my score for the first time at the premiere." Strangely, though, the director emphatically thanks Zimmer for the score and Zimmer's name appears atop the credits for the film and album. For those who claim that the composer's army of assistants can't be referred to as "ghostwriters," the controversy understandably began with The Whole Wide World. Nothing ever came of it, though, likely because of the project's total obscurity. Regardless of its curious production, the resulting music is an early and interesting look at Gregson-Williams' solo talent.

Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
155 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 2.94 Stars
***** 28 5 Stars
**** 29 4 Stars
*** 38 3 Stars
** 27 2 Stars
* 33 1 Stars
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COMMENTS
1 TOTAL COMMENTS
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Awesome soundtrack
Armando Sanchez - September 5, 2005, at 2:30 p.m.
1 comment  (2970 views)
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Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 42:17
• 1. The Love Theme (2:45)
• 2. Two Sides of Bob (6:18)
• 3. Conan Emerges (1:29)
• 4. Novalyne Reflects (2:53)
• 5. The Telegram (5:20)
• 6. A Yarn Unfolds (2:43)
• 7. Letters at Sunset/The Cabin (7:07)
• 8. Bob's Despair (1:41)
• 9. ...Let Go of your Mother (3:34)
• 10. Novalyne's Theme (3:09)
• 11. Sombrero (0:31)
• 12. End Titles (4:42)
(1:12 of total time is silence)

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes a note about the score and film from director Dan Ireland.
Copyright © 1997-2015, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from The Whole Wide World are Copyright © 1997, Mojo Music Inc/Mojotrax and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 7/17/04 and last updated 9/29/11.
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