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Zodiac
(2007)
Album Cover Art
Composed, Orchestrated, Conducted, Co-Performed, and Co-Produced by:
David Shire

Co-Produced by:
Martin Erskine

Co-Performed by:
The Skywalker Symphony Orchestra
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LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Varèse Sarabande
(March 13th, 2007)
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ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
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ALSO SEE




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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... only if have appreciated David Shire's contribution in the context of the film, where it adeptly adapts several sources of inspiration, including his own music of the 1970's, into the tense and highly challenging environment of suspense and disillusionment.

Avoid it... if forty minutes of atonal ambience meant purely to frustrate the listener with the fear of unresolved mystery is not worth hearing Shire return to the mainstream after two decades.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,855
WRITTEN 8/15/11
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Shire
Shire
Zodiac: (David Shire) It was inevitable that a film devoted to the discouraging search for clues about San Francisco's Zodiac killer of the late 1960's and early 1970's would be equally frustrating, but that did not stop director David Fincher from torturing audiences with a story as unresolved as its real life inspiration. Despite a string of murders and the tormenting of the San Francisco press and police with a series of cryptic letters, the identity of the Zodiac killer has never been discovered. The only suspect, and a central figure in Fincher's Zodiac, died in the early 1990's and DNA testing in 2002 eventually exonerated him anyway. Tremendous care was taken by the director, screenwriter James Vanderbilt, and producer Brad Fischer to expand upon the accounts of the investigation published by cartoonist Robert Graysmith. As the lead character in Zodiac, Graysmith was long obsessed with his own search for clues about the killer, eventually supported by reporters and, indirectly, by the police as he continued his investigation for decades. Everything in Zodiac was extremely painstakingly undertaken, the locale using special effects to complete the San Francisco of the era and the facts of the case very carefully assembled and presented so that the film would not convict any one person. As the studios had feared, however, Fincher's finished product ran too long to sustain audience interest, and between that length, the lack of a resolution, and very few action sequences, Zodiac was a financial failure. It did, however, receive very respectful and/or positive reviews, however, as did David Shire's score for the film. The story of Shire's involvement in Zodiac is itself a lengthy topic, but one satisfying for film score collectors who fondly recall the composer's strong contributions to the genre in the 1970's. Fincher originally gained studio approval to utilize no original score material at all for the project, instead assembling source pieces ranging from vintage rock songs to the quiet loneliness of Shire's piano theme from the classic 1974 espionage film The Conversation. As production progressed, however, Fincher and his sound designer agreed that Zodiac would require 15 to 20 minutes of music, and eventually they came to hire Shire himself to write what essentially amounts to an adaptation of his own works and other modern American sources.



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VIEWER RATINGS
96 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 2.85 Stars
***** 18 5 Stars
**** 16 4 Stars
*** 21 3 Stars
** 16 2 Stars
* 25 1 Stars
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Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 39:57
• 1. Aftermaths (4:08)
• 2. Graysmith (1:29)
• 3. Law & Disorder (4:16)
• 4. Trailer Park (2:51)
• 5. Dare To Dream (1:21)
• 6. Avery & Graysmith, Toschi & Armstrong (3:29)
• 7. Graysmith Obsessed (4:09)
• 8. Are You Done? (2:22)
• 9. Closer & Closer (3:14)
• 10. Confrontation (3:34)
• 11. Graysmith's Theme (2:35)

Bonus Tracks:
• 12. Toschi's Theme (Unused) (2:10)
• 13. Graysmith's Theme (Piano Version)* (1:48)
* contains spotting session dialogue at the end

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes a list of performers and a long note from the composer about his approach to the score.
Copyright © 2011-2017, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from Zodiac are Copyright © 2007, Varèse Sarabande and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 8/15/11 (and not updated significantly since).
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