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Comments about the soundtrack for Star Wars: Attack of the Clones (John Williams)
Why was Duel of the Fates used?

Bud Fox
(nycecwch01b.us.socgen.com)


  Responses to this Comment:
Bud Fox
Lux
Serge Desir
Why was Duel of the Fates used?   Monday, May 20, 2002 (8:31 a.m.) 

Hey, I would just be curious on people's thoughts, story-wise/theme-wise, why do you think DOTF used during the Tatooine/Anakin/Tusken Raider scene? I just don't see it. I appreciated the effort, and it's exicitng music so it added urgency to the scene, but what is that theme supposed to represent in the big picture of the movies? Is it now taking the place of the Star Wars main theme being used in the prequels? Maybe because this trilogy is darker, and 4-6 is more heroic? I'm just throwing that out there, because I'm just not sure now...

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Bud Fox
(nycecwch01a.us.socgen.com)

  In Response to:
Bud Fox
Re: Why was Duel of the Fates used?   Monday, May 20, 2002 (8:51 a.m.) 

By reading down a little farther I found this post, and it pretty much answered my questions. Thanks, Damar.

the title theme doesn't appear in the film because...

Posted by: Damar, damar@gmx.de
Thursday, May 9, 2002, at 4:43 a.m. (p50914171.dip0.t-ipconnect.de)

...according to the booklets of the Special Editions it has always been considered to be Luke's Theme. So it could be frequently used throughout Episode IV, Episode V and Episode VI. Now, due to the fact that Luke Skywalker doesn't appear in Episode I and II (I don't know about Episode III), the absence of his theme is quite understandable, isn't it? I think Williams knows exactly what is to do, especially in terms of thematic development.
I also guess the appearance of Luke's Theme in the Main Title and End Credits remains unquestioned...

Greetings to all those out there who love good music!
(especially film scores...of course)

Damar

> Hey, I would just be curious on people's thoughts, story-wise/theme-wise,
> why do you think DOTF used during the Tatooine/Anakin/Tusken Raider scene?
> I just don't see it. I appreciated the effort, and it's exicitng music so
> it added urgency to the scene, but what is that theme supposed to
> represent in the big picture of the movies? Is it now taking the place of
> the Star Wars main theme being used in the prequels? Maybe because this
> trilogy is darker, and 4-6 is more heroic? I'm just throwing that out
> there, because I'm just not sure now...


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Lux
<Send E-Mail>
(cm077.233.234.24.lvcm.com)

  In Response to:
Bud Fox
Re: Why was Duel of the Fates used?   Monday, May 20, 2002 (3:08 p.m.) 

> Hey, I would just be curious on people's thoughts, story-wise/theme-wise,
> why do you think DOTF used during the Tatooine/Anakin/Tusken Raider scene?
> I just don't see it. I appreciated the effort, and it's exicitng music so
> it added urgency to the scene, but what is that theme supposed to
> represent in the big picture of the movies? Is it now taking the place of
> the Star Wars main theme being used in the prequels? Maybe because this
> trilogy is darker, and 4-6 is more heroic? I'm just throwing that out
> there, because I'm just not sure now...

I think it was used because the song represents a "Duel of the Fates". Meaning a battle between what the fate of Anakin will be. In the first one, that meant a battle between Jedi and Sith, determining if he would be trained at all. In that scene where he runs to find his mother, it is a defining character moment, in which he will soon unlease a lot of anger, furthering his path to the dark side, yet it is still a duel, because he has the good intentions of saving his mother.
So it's a whole bunch of Anakin emotion fighting itself. Very approrpiate for the scene.

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Serge Desir
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(6532200hfc179.tampabay.rr.com)

  In Response to:
Bud Fox

  Responses to this Comment:
Bud Fox
Diego
Re: Why was Duel of the Fates used?   Tuesday, May 21, 2002 (4:45 p.m.) 

> Hey, I would just be curious on people's thoughts, story-wise/theme-wise,
> why do you think DOTF used during the Tatooine/Anakin/Tusken Raider scene?
> I just don't see it. I appreciated the effort, and it's exicitng music so
> it added urgency to the scene, but what is that theme supposed to
> represent in the big picture of the movies? Is it now taking the place of
> the Star Wars main theme being used in the prequels? Maybe because this
> trilogy is darker, and 4-6 is more heroic? I'm just throwing that out
> there, because I'm just not sure now...

These movies are about how the tide of goodness relative to the force was shifted to the Dark Side. It is about how destiny cannot be avoided and how the Prophecy of the Chosen One is revealed.

The moment when Anakin leaves to find his mother heralds the first obvious hint of his fate. It is a crucial film moment because the way he handles his mother's death is the point in time he will fall into Darkness and the evil that is Darth Vader begins to take shape. In a sense, Duel of the Fates falls between the Force Theme, The Imperial March, and The Emperor's Theme in this series. The Force Theme constantly tries to overcome the moody grimness of this score. The Emperor's Theme reminds the audience that the Dark Side is at work and The Imperial March is a testament to the foreboding threat the Dark Side and tyranny represent. Duel of the Fate is the crux between the Force Theme and the twin evils of The Imperial March and The Emperor's Theme.

Just my thoughts.


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Bud Fox
(nycecwch01a.us.socgen.com)

  In Response to:
Serge Desir
Re: Why was Duel of the Fates used?   Wednesday, May 22, 2002 (8:36 a.m.) 

Very nice explanation. Probably the best I've heard so far. I like the idea of using the theme as a grey area between good and evil. The music in DOF even goes back and forth like it's fighting itself. How fitting. Thanks for posting.

> These movies are about how the tide of goodness relative to the force was
> shifted to the Dark Side. It is about how destiny cannot be avoided and
> how the Prophecy of the Chosen One is revealed.

> The moment when Anakin leaves to find his mother heralds the first obvious
> hint of his fate. It is a crucial film moment because the way he handles
> his mother's death is the point in time he will fall into Darkness and the
> evil that is Darth Vader begins to take shape. In a sense, Duel of the
> Fates falls between the Force Theme, The Imperial March, and The Emperor's
> Theme in this series. The Force Theme constantly tries to overcome the
> moody grimness of this score. The Emperor's Theme reminds the audience
> that the Dark Side is at work and The Imperial March is a testament to the
> foreboding threat the Dark Side and tyranny represent. Duel of the Fate is
> the crux between the Force Theme and the twin evils of The Imperial March
> and The Emperor's Theme.

> Just my thoughts.


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Diego
(dial-148-240-20-148.zone-1.dial.n
et.mx)

  In Response to:
Serge Desir
WOW!! Smart Guy!! *NM*   Wednesday, May 22, 2002 (3:13 p.m.) 



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