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Harry Potter track 2: the Jurassic Park wannabe

Dan Sartori
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(p-proxy-1-int0.net.wisc.edu)


  Responses to this Comment:
MSM
Harry Potter track 2: the Jurassic Park wannabe   Monday, April 8, 2002 (9:59 a.m.) 

I'm specifically talking about track 2 in the HP score. I haven't heard any of the rest of the music, but if it is all like track 2, then I must say that I don't think the score is very good at all.

First of all, track 2 doesn't really bear any resemblance to Schindler's List at all (despite those who say it does) except the very opening riff, which sounds almost exactly like the Schindler's List theme with only slight instrumentation differences. I've been told, however, that this is Harry's theme which runs throughout the soundtrack. The problem with this is that it is a major theme and we hear it not once or twice, but CONTINUOUSLY throughout the movie, which detracts from the score's originality greatly since Schindler's List is popular. If Williams had copied the theme from a lesser-known movie, then it might have been ok. but he chose SL. What ends up happening is that we unconsciously pair the music from Schindler's List with the movie SL which cripples the message that Harry Potter does have, especially since the two films are vastly different.

The thing that I am most unhappy with regarding this track is all the similarities it bears to Jurassic Park. There are many cues where, if I knew the general theme of JP but didn't own the soundtrack, I would think that I was actually listening to JP music. The instrumentation and method of writing is exactly the same as that used in JP, and I can point to several specific spots where there are blatant similarities. The music which begins at 00:54 of Harry's Wondrous World sounds very similar to music from JP track 4 "Journey to the Island" before 01:21 of that track. In fact, I put on both of them at once and found that they sound almost exactly the same (not in the order of the notes, but in the sound of the music - instrumentation, volume, style of playing, etc.). The other part that is painfully similar to JP is the part in Harry's Wondrous World that begins at 03:59. This passage is obviously derived from JP's End Credits. Other places throughout the soundtrack feature the juggling of the theme from horns to trumpets and back again - a cue straight from JP - and straight string accompaniment for a trumpet theme - another theme that is taken directly from JP.

The problem with all of this is that Jurassic Park and Schindler's List are about as different of movies as you can get from Harry Potter, so the music shouldn't sound the same. If it does, as is the case with Harry Potter, then you confuse the audience as far as what emotions you are trying to convey to them. These two concerns (the stealing of previous motifs and the confusion of emotional content) are the same reason that Bicentennial Man fails to be an inspiring score. What people on this site need to realize is that the order of notes in a theme is NOT the primary element that makes music sound different from piece to piece, but rather that it is ONE OF THE WAYS in which composers distinguish between pieces. Other things such as instrumentation, style of playing, tempo, and dynamics are just as important.

Overall, I give the second track of Harry Potter 2 stars, and if the rest of the soundtrack is anything like it, I don't recommend it.

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MSM
(pcb16.cpedu.rug.nl)

  In Response to:
Dan Sartori

  Responses to this Comment:
Dan Sartori
Amuro
Re: Harry Potter track 2: the Jurassic Park wannabe   Monday, May 6, 2002 (7:26 a.m.) 

Forgive me, but is it the first time you heard music in your life?? That's would be the only reason why you could say HP, JP and Schindler sounded the same. The style used on HP (which is instrumentation, rhythm, harmonies, melodic lines) are completely different from that on JP not to speak of that of Schindler (of course there's always some Williams style in it regarding to certain heroic passages or counterpoint). You say there are points that are exactly the same, maybe you can tell me wich points those are.
How can you say that "the opening of HP is exactly the same as the Schindler theme with only slight orchestration differences" !? HP is in 6/8, Schindler in 4/4, HP has thirds, Schindler has fifths, just to name some differences in the melody (not to speak of the differences in orchestration!)
What do you know about music? Maybe you heard the three scores 1 or 2 times some time ago? Listen again and hear the differences.

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Dan Sartori
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  In Response to:
MSM

  Responses to this Comment:
Roman Dlouhý
Pawel Stroinski
Amuro
Re: Harry Potter track 2: the Jurassic Park wannabe   Thursday, May 9, 2002 (12:33 p.m.) 

> Forgive me, but is it the first time you heard music in your life?? That's
> would be the only reason why you could say HP, JP and Schindler sounded
> the same. The style used on HP (which is instrumentation, rhythm,
> harmonies, melodic lines) are completely different from that on JP not to
> speak of that of Schindler (of course there's always some Williams style
> in it regarding to certain heroic passages or counterpoint). You say there
> are points that are exactly the same, maybe you can tell me wich points
> those are.
How can you say that "the opening of HP is exactly the
> same as the Schindler theme with only slight orchestration
> differences" !? HP is in 6/8, Schindler in 4/4, HP has thirds,
> Schindler has fifths, just to name some differences in the melody (not to
> speak of the differences in orchestration!)
What do you know about
> music? Maybe you heard the three scores 1 or 2 times some time ago? Listen
> again and hear the differences.

You are the type of person, MSM, that I have a very difficult time respecting, and your comment only helps to reinforce that. I will give you my musical credentials so you can decide for yourself whether or not this is the first time I've listened to music in my life. I am a 19 year old college freshman who has been studying the trombone for 8 years. I am a music education major at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. Although trombone is my primary instrument, I am also a drummer, euphoniumist, pianist, singer, and aspiring guitarist, as well as a songwriter and soundtrack enthusiast. I have been a member of the 2000 Wisconsin State Music Association High School State Honors Band, 2000 Wisconsin National Band Association All-State Band, and the prestigious Milwaukee Youth Symphony Orchestra, where I held the principal trombonist position in Junior Winds Ensemble (1997-98), Philharmonia (1998-99), and Senior Symphony (1999-2001). I have received the UW-Green Bay Summer Band Camp scholarship twice (1998 and 1999), Outstanding Soloist at 1999 Stevens Point Jazz Clinic, WSMA Solo and Ensemble Scholarship (2001), John Philip Sousa Band Award, Louis Armstrong Jazz Award, and UW-Madison Summer Music Clinic Scholarship, among others. Prominent musicians I have worked with include Benjamin Zander (Boston Philharmonic, New England Conservatory of Music), Michael Mulcahy (Northwestern University - Illinois, Chicago Symphony Orchestra), John Zdechlik (composer - Chorale and Shaker Dance), Richard Erb (St. Louis Symphony), Gary Greenhoe (Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra), Russell Mikkelson (University of Ohio), Mark Niehaus (Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra), Alan Baer (Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra), and John Aley (UW-Madison). I am currently studying under Dr. William Richardson, Professor of Trombone at UW-Madison. He has worked with such notable composers as Stravinsky and Copland, and has performed with the US National Guard Band as well as with the St. Louis Symphony. It was very rude of you to make that comment regarding my credentials, and I think an apology is in order. Such comments only make the commenter look bad.

As for your comments, I would like to say that you need to read my comment more carefully before responding, because there are several elements there which reflect a blatant disregard for what I had to say. Remember that I was not attempting to write a review of the entire soundtrack, only track 2 (a point that I made abundantly clear at the outset of my comment and that you subsequently ignored). I gave you several examples of SPECIFIC points - with time markings - that I thought were far too close to each other in many respects, but you must have missed these also. The fact that this track of HP was in 6/8 and the Schindler's List theme was in 4/4 makes little difference: the order and sequence of notes is almost exactly the same, plus it's easy to make that theme switch time signatures. This is leading the listener into the wrong mindset. I'll say it again: since the Harry theme is so similar to Schindler's List, many listeners get the wrong idea about what is supposedly being conveyed. The writing style is very similar to that used by Williams in Jurassic Park, and it sounds to me like he is not trying hard enough to break from that style.

I would appreciate it if you would provide some specifics next time you respond, MSM. Also, please read the comment you're responding to more carefully so that the person doesn't have to repeat everything like I had to here. If you still have questions, refer back to my original posting before you ask them, please.

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Roman Dlouhý
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  In Response to:
Dan Sartori

  Responses to this Comment:
Dan Sartori
Dan Sartori
Dan, you're better off sticking to LOTR score...   Friday, May 17, 2002 (7:42 a.m.) 

...as its apparent you find very little that delights you about as many scores by John Williams as exactly you have mentioned on this site. I won't comment on your "benign" post you've written for MSM for him to comprehend how much you have achieved so far so there must be something about truthfulness of your jugmatical comments on several recent Williams' scores. People like you cloud the otherwise sunny and friendly conversations on sites like this.

I'm sorry.

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Dan Sartori
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  In Response to:
Roman Dlouhý

  Responses to this Comment:
Roman Dlouhý
Re: Dan, you're better off sticking to LOTR score...   Friday, May 17, 2002 (11:53 a.m.) 

> ...as its apparent you find very little that delights you about as many
> scores by John Williams as exactly you have mentioned on this site. I
> won't comment on your "benign" post you've written for MSM for
> him to comprehend how much you have achieved so far so there must be
> something about truthfulness of your jugmatical comments on several recent
> Williams' scores. People like you cloud the otherwise sunny and friendly
> conversations on sites like this.

> I'm sorry.

Roman, I'm sorry that you feel that way. I do not intend to be overly judgmental of any score, but I should be allowed to express my opinion just like
anybody else. I thought this was a comment website, maybe I'm wrong. I am a musician, and maybe I am used to looking at music critically, but I am NOT trying to "cloud" anybody's viewpoint. I do believe that every composer is capable of both excellence and folly, and I think that Harry Potter is more an example of John Williams folly than of John Williams excellence. If you think that it is the greatest piece of music ever written, that's fine. Just because I don't think it is doesn't mean that you have to hold the same opinion.

I think if you looked at other posts you would see that I really am not anti-Williams. I have only good things to say about his masterpieces (like E.T., Jurassic Park, Star Wars, among others). I AM, however, a critical listener. I do not take all music to be excellent just because John Williams wrote it. I think this would also be a good time to point out that there are many Horner scores that I think are below average. Bicentennial Man, Deep Impact, and Enemy at the Gates are three that come to mind right now. Maybe I should post something on those...

Thank you for your opinion, but I am allowed to have my own, too. It's too bad that you see me as always negative, I really do not mean to be that way. Why don't you read my posts at the E.T. or Braveheart page. Those will hopefully lift your spirits .

Respectfully,
Dan

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Roman Dlouhý
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Dan Sartori

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MSM
I apologize! I'm taking my Friday's post back.   Monday, May 20, 2002 (6:57 a.m.) 

Dan,

I'd been quite cranked up on Friday and so I'd managed to engender that in-no-way aforethought post. I would like to apologize for it being what it was now.

Sure we are all entitled to our opinions; so am I and are you as well. Although I still disagree with some points as you presented them in your posts --those regarding Harry Potter score music--, I respect you as a person and a poster just as much as I have a respect for all the earnest movie music fans and classical music fans (performers ) in general, without all of whom the site wouldn't be the same.

I personally don't consider Harry Potter score to be the Williams' ever-finest achievement, but I do like it so much that I couldn't do without it. It may not be a so-called "work of art" (I have no musical education and the only thing I am aware of is that there possibly ARE 8 basic notes, so I can't tell much about quality), but I couldn't care less and I love the score. Sure, harry Potter reminds me of some other Williams' scores even as to its orchestration, but this is the advantage rather than a groundbreaking drawback. This is why it's easy to distinguish Williams' works among others.

Dan, this is what perhaps puts the wall between us, the differentiating opinion, but it's natural to dissent and I myself wouldn't be any keen in Williams' coming up with something (musically) different or innovative with each new score to which he would have given birth. If there's something he does great (fans can testify to it at concerts by applauding), something that can be easily recognized and rewardingly accepted by audience, I think there's possibly nothing wrong about "sounding the same" on occasion. If I want a difference, I go listen to Jerry Goldsmith, Miklós Rózsa, Bernard Herrmann and others and everything works fine with me.

If there would be too much diversity in John Williams' music that would make it harder to connect with Williams persona (such attempts by the composer could not have been more evident with scores like "Heartbeeps" or "Sleepers"), I doubt there would be any need for as many composers as there are nowadays to be found. That's why there are so many of them to "stumble upon". They all somewhat "stick to" their styles and it makes them distinguishable, likable if you want. I don't find it casting me down and I don't thing it would be the case with you. I also don't think that occasionally returning to the same waters --again as what concerns orchestration or stylization of chord progression-- is not what can debase the value of music John writes, I mean as long as it is good enough to impress and stir up the good in us. But when it fails to impress, that'd be another chapter I wouldn't like to open here since the Harry Potter score isn't the case with me and "Sleepers" has no forum enabled.

Thanks for that you apparently haven't allowed for my Friday's post to make you be browned off at me so much or something. You're nice!

(I mostly DO agree with you about Horner's scores. I have read all I could find at other pages on this site that belongs to you. Keep it up. And again, I apologize and I mean my apology!)

Roman.-)

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MSM
(pc113b.farmedu.rug.nl)

  In Response to:
Roman Dlouhý

  Responses to this Comment:
Amuro
Don't take it too heavy!   Tuesday, May 28, 2002 (8:50 a.m.) 

Hi guys!

I think it's time for a posting by me; sorry I haven't been on this specific page for some time so please don't see me as a coward who says something and withdraws after .

I read you're response and concluded that it really bothered you what I posted. I would really like to apologize for my way of expression. It was provoking to question if you heard music for the first time. But, needless to say, of course I knew it was not really the first time you heard music, and my statement should've been rather interpreted as a metaphor, and should therefore not have offended you as much as it apparently did. But it did, and I am sorry for that.
The only thing I wanted was a sharp discussion on the comparing you made, but I admit, my way of saying was probably too emotional and therefore not the right way for making my intention clear.

Still, if I have the right , I don't agree with you as to the resemblance. The background of my remark lies in the fact that I thoroughly know the music and the compositional styles of John Williams. On the basis of what I know, I can say that the HP theme crucially differs from the Schindler's List theme, at least technically seen: the rhythm is quite different (like you say yourself, an other meter), the descending intervals are thirds in HP and fifths in SL, the tonality differs, the instrumentation differs greatly (a huge tutti in HP against a solo violin in SL) and after at most the first two measures the themes definitely diverge. Maybe you say those are tiny differences, but to me those differences mean a great difference in emotional content (HP more waltz-like as a mysterious dance, SL more real, stately and solemn). I just can't see why you say the two themes sound the same, maybe you can tell me what you think of my statements.

Thank you for sharing your c.v. with us, I must say that it is quite impressive! You must be proud to be related to Stravinsky and Copland, two of my most favourite composers! By the way, I'm a musician too (a violinist to be more precise, namely a musical grandson of Yehudi Menuhin, so to speak, and besides a relative of quite a famous cellist ), and do have some knowledge about music myself.

The thing I really didn't wanted to be the perpetrator of was a quarrel, which I almost caused, as I read. It has been a great pleasure discussing classical music and film music (especially Williams') with Roman, and I am certain this can and will be great with you too henceforward.

Thanks,
MSM


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Amuro
(12-222-158-77.client.insightbb.co
m)
Profile Picture
  In Response to:
MSM
Re: Don't take it too heavy!   Thursday, April 10, 2003 (6:36 p.m.) 

> Hi guys!

> I think it's time for a posting by me; sorry I haven't been on this
> specific page for some time so please don't see me as a coward who says
> something and withdraws after .

> I read you're response and concluded that it really bothered you what I
> posted. I would really like to apologize for my way of expression. It was
> provoking to question if you heard music for the first time. But, needless
> to say, of course I knew it was not really the first time you heard music,
> and my statement should've been rather interpreted as a metaphor, and
> should therefore not have offended you as much as it apparently did. But
> it did, and I am sorry for that.
The only thing I wanted was a sharp
> discussion on the comparing you made, but I admit, my way of saying was
> probably too emotional and therefore not the right way for making my
> intention clear.

> Still, if I have the right , I don't agree with you as to the
> resemblance. The background of my remark lies in the fact that I
> thoroughly know the music and the compositional styles of John Williams.
> On the basis of what I know, I can say that the HP theme crucially differs
> from the Schindler's List theme, at least technically seen: the rhythm is
> quite different (like you say yourself, an other meter), the descending
> intervals are thirds in HP and fifths in SL, the tonality differs, the
> instrumentation differs greatly (a huge tutti in HP against a solo
> violin
in SL) and after at most the first two measures the themes
> definitely diverge. Maybe you say those are tiny differences, but to
> me
those differences mean a great difference in emotional content (HP
> more waltz-like as a mysterious dance, SL more real, stately and solemn).
> I just can't see why you say the two themes sound the same, maybe you can
> tell me what you think of my statements.

> Thank you for sharing your c.v. with us, I must say that it is quite
> impressive! You must be proud to be related to Stravinsky and Copland, two
> of my most favourite composers! By the way, I'm a musician too (a
> violinist to be more precise, namely a musical grandson of Yehudi Menuhin,
> so to speak, and besides a relative of quite a famous cellist ), and do
> have some knowledge about music myself.

> The thing I really didn't wanted to be the perpetrator of was a quarrel,
> which I almost caused, as I read. It has been a great pleasure discussing
> classical music and film music (especially Williams') with Roman, and I am
> certain this can and will be great with you too henceforward.

> Thanks,
MSM
I too apologize. I was ill when i posted this and i wasn't thinking straight. But reading someone dis-on harry potter scores makes me mad because if it weren't for the Harry Potter score i would not be into film music and i would not have a dream of becoming the John Williams of the new century or just some film composer so i am deeply sorry i was in the wrong.

Forgive me, Amuro

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Dan Sartori
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(1cust39.tnt22.chiega.da.uu.net)

  In Response to:
Roman Dlouhý
Re: Dan, you're better off sticking to LOTR score...   Friday, May 17, 2002 (12:02 p.m.) 

> ...as its apparent you find very little that delights you about as many
> scores by John Williams as exactly you have mentioned on this site. I
> won't comment on your "benign" post you've written for MSM for
> him to comprehend how much you have achieved so far so there must be
> something about truthfulness of your jugmatical comments on several recent
> Williams' scores. People like you cloud the otherwise sunny and friendly
> conversations on sites like this.

> I'm sorry.

P.S. Just so there's no confusion, I gave MSM my resume because he had asked if this is the first time I'd heard music in my life. I thought the best way to answer that would be to let him make his own decision based on fact instead of emotion. So call it "benign" if you will, I just wanted to show everyone that I am an educated listener. Oh, I just thought of another post that I put an encouraging JW comment on. Check out the comments under The Patriot. I absolutely LOVE this score!


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Pawel Stroinski
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  In Response to:
Dan Sartori
Re: Harry Potter track 2: the Jurassic Park wannabe   Thursday, August 8, 2002 (11:10 a.m.) 

> You are the type of person, MSM, that I have a very difficult time
> respecting, and your comment only helps to reinforce that. I will give you
> my musical credentials so you can decide for yourself whether or not this
> is the first time I've listened to music in my life. I am a 19 year old
> college freshman who has been studying the trombone for 8 years. I am a
> music education major at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. Although
> trombone is my primary instrument, I am also a drummer, euphoniumist,
> pianist, singer, and aspiring guitarist, as well as a songwriter and
> soundtrack enthusiast. I have been a member of the 2000 Wisconsin State
> Music Association High School State Honors Band, 2000 Wisconsin National
> Band Association All-State Band, and the prestigious Milwaukee Youth
> Symphony Orchestra, where I held the principal trombonist position in
> Junior Winds Ensemble (1997-98), Philharmonia (1998-99), and Senior
> Symphony (1999-2001). I have received the UW-Green Bay Summer Band Camp
> scholarship twice (1998 and 1999), Outstanding Soloist at 1999 Stevens
> Point Jazz Clinic, WSMA Solo and Ensemble Scholarship (2001), John Philip
> Sousa Band Award, Louis Armstrong Jazz Award, and UW-Madison Summer Music
> Clinic Scholarship, among others. Prominent musicians I have worked with
> include Benjamin Zander (Boston Philharmonic, New England Conservatory of
> Music), Michael Mulcahy (Northwestern University - Illinois, Chicago
> Symphony Orchestra), John Zdechlik (composer - Chorale and Shaker Dance),
> Richard Erb (St. Louis Symphony), Gary Greenhoe (Milwaukee Symphony
> Orchestra), Russell Mikkelson (University of Ohio), Mark Niehaus
> (Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra), Alan Baer (Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra),
> and John Aley (UW-Madison). I am currently studying under Dr. William
> Richardson, Professor of Trombone at UW-Madison. He has worked with such
> notable composers as Stravinsky and Copland, and has performed with the US
> National Guard Band as well as with the St. Louis Symphony. It was very
> rude of you to make that comment regarding my credentials, and I think an
> apology is in order. Such comments only make the commenter look bad.

Dan, I too have problems in respecting guys like MSM.

I have one question. What exactly an euphonium is? How does it sound?

Pawel

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Amuro
(12-222-158-77.client.insightbb.co
m)
Profile Picture
  In Response to:
Dan Sartori
Re: Harry Potter track 2: the Jurassic Park wannabe   Saturday, April 5, 2003 (9:20 a.m.) 

How can you say that "the opening of HP is exactly the
What do you
> know about

> You are the type of person, MSM, that I have a very difficult time
> respecting, and your comment only helps to reinforce that. I will give you
> my musical credentials so you can decide for yourself whether or not this
> is the first time I've listened to music in my life. I am a 19 year old
> college freshman who has been studying the trombone for 8 years. I am a
> music education major at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. Although
> trombone is my primary instrument, I am also a drummer, euphoniumist,
> pianist, singer, and aspiring guitarist, as well as a songwriter and
> soundtrack enthusiast. I have been a member of the 2000 Wisconsin State
> Music Association High School State Honors Band, 2000 Wisconsin National
> Band Association All-State Band, and the prestigious Milwaukee Youth
> Symphony Orchestra, where I held the principal trombonist position in
> Junior Winds Ensemble (1997-98), Philharmonia (1998-99), and Senior
> Symphony (1999-2001). I have received the UW-Green Bay Summer Band Camp
> scholarship twice (1998 and 1999), Outstanding Soloist at 1999 Stevens
> Point Jazz Clinic, WSMA Solo and Ensemble Scholarship (2001), John Philip
> Sousa Band Award, Louis Armstrong Jazz Award, and UW-Madison Summer Music
> Clinic Scholarship, among others. Prominent musicians I have worked with
> include Benjamin Zander (Boston Philharmonic, New England Conservatory of
> Music), Michael Mulcahy (Northwestern University - Illinois, Chicago
> Symphony Orchestra), John Zdechlik (composer - Chorale and Shaker Dance),
> Richard Erb (St. Louis Symphony), Gary Greenhoe (Milwaukee Symphony
> Orchestra), Russell Mikkelson (University of Ohio), Mark Niehaus
> (Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra), Alan Baer (Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra),
> and John Aley (UW-Madison). I am currently studying under Dr. William
> Richardson, Professor of Trombone at UW-Madison. He has worked with such
> notable composers as Stravinsky and Copland, and has performed with the US
> National Guard Band as well as with the St. Louis Symphony. It was very
> rude of you to make that comment regarding my credentials, and I think an
> apology is in order. Such comments only make the commenter look bad.

> As for your comments, I would like to say that you need to read my comment
> more carefully before responding, because there are several elements there
> which reflect a blatant disregard for what I had to say. Remember that I
> was not attempting to write a review of the entire soundtrack, only track
> 2 (a point that I made abundantly clear at the outset of my comment and
> that you subsequently ignored). I gave you several examples of SPECIFIC
> points - with time markings - that I thought were far too close to each
> other in many respects, but you must have missed these also. The fact that
> this track of HP was in 6/8 and the Schindler's List theme was in 4/4
> makes little difference: the order and sequence of notes is almost exactly
> the same, plus it's easy to make that theme switch time signatures. This
> is leading the listener into the wrong mindset. I'll say it again: since
> the Harry theme is so similar to Schindler's List, many listeners get the
> wrong idea about what is supposedly being conveyed. The writing style is
> very similar to that used by Williams in Jurassic Park, and it sounds to
> me like he is not trying hard enough to break from that style.

> I would appreciate it if you would provide some specifics next time you
> respond, MSM. Also, please read the comment you're responding to more
> carefully so that the person doesn't have to repeat everything like I had
> to here. If you still have questions, refer back to my original posting
> before you ask them, please.
I don't care how much you have done with music. I am fourteen and i tought myself how to compose and i have been thinking about getting some of my music published. I am the schools composer. I have written music for my schools mideival fare and i wrote several pieces for social studies. But that doesn't mean i think that i am all high and mighty. That guy has a right to disagree. I disagree too. I have all three soundtracks that you are speaking about. I dont agree. SL is dark and tells of a time when the persecution of jews was going on. The theme thus reflects that time. Harry Potter is mysterious and they don't really sound alike. As for JP i don't agree. The theme is beautiful in both films, but Harry's Wondrous World is not all that much like the theme. Harry's Wondrous world has a feeling of wonder (Harry's WOUNDROUS world) and is very almost arrogant throughout the whole thing. JP has a feeling that something isn't quite right. And i am sticking to the second track only so that should make you happy. But it is true that the theme is repeated throughout the whole soundtrack, but since they aren't alike its fine and the music fits the film brilliantly and I think this is one of the greatest JW scores i have ever heard. Granted it was the first score i ever heard but, it's truly original and i think that it is one of the best and everyone don't listen to this guy. I recommend it with a *****.

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Amuro
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  In Response to:
MSM
Re: Harry Potter track 2: the Jurassic Park wannabe   Saturday, April 5, 2003 (9:05 a.m.) 

> Forgive me, but is it the first time you heard music in your life?? That's
> would be the only reason why you could say HP, JP and Schindler sounded
> the same. The style used on HP (which is instrumentation, rhythm,
> harmonies, melodic lines) are completely different from that on JP not to
> speak of that of Schindler (of course there's always some Williams style
> in it regarding to certain heroic passages or counterpoint). You say there
> are points that are exactly the same, maybe you can tell me wich points
> those are.
How can you say that "the opening of HP is exactly the
> same as the Schindler theme with only slight orchestration
> differences" !? HP is in 6/8, Schindler in 4/4, HP has thirds,
> Schindler has fifths, just to name some differences in the melody (not to
> speak of the differences in orchestration!)
What do you know about
> music? Maybe you heard the three scores 1 or 2 times some time ago? Listen
> again and hear the differences.
Actually Harry Potter is in 3/4 time not 6/8.

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