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Comments about the soundtrack for King Arthur (Hans Zimmer)
King Zimmer

Neptune
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  Responses to this Comment:
ruzzov
Danny2004
King Zimmer   Sunday, July 25, 2004 (11:09 a.m.) 

Hans Zimmer once again proves that he is number one film composer in Hollywood. It's out of the question, my friends. Some people think that Zimmer is only able to compose action, synthesized music. I don't agree with them. I know that the best action scores were composed by Zimmer (Crimson Tide, The Rock, The Peacemaker) but he can make gorgeous music for all kinds of films. Take for example Black Hawk Down, As Good As It Gets or upcoming Thunderbirds. That's why the best directors dream about working with Hans Zimmer. I am a great fan of classical music but I don't see anything wrong with using synthesizers. I love Franz Schubert's piano sonatas and I admire "Chase", "Mutiny" and "The Battle" as well. I hope that one day Academy critics will open their minds because we live in XXI century and we have to accept that music is changing. King Arthur definitely deserves an Oscar as well as The Thin Red Line, Gladiator, The Last Samurai and many more. Thank you Hans for making our world a better place to live. *****

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ruzzov
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  In Response to:
Neptune

  Responses to this Comment:
CS^TBL
Neptune
Re: King Zimmer   Sunday, July 25, 2004 (12:20 p.m.) 

> Hans Zimmer once again proves that he is number one film composer in
> Hollywood. It's out of the question, my friends. Some people think that
> Zimmer is only able to compose action, synthesized music. I don't agree
> with them. I know that the best action scores were composed by Zimmer
> (Crimson Tide, The Rock, The Peacemaker) but he can make gorgeous music
> for all kinds of films. Take for example Black Hawk Down, As Good As It
> Gets or upcoming Thunderbirds. That's why the best directors dream about
> working with Hans Zimmer. I am a great fan of classical music but I don't
> see anything wrong with using synthesizers. I love Franz Schubert's piano
> sonatas and I admire "Chase", "Mutiny" and "The
> Battle" as well. I hope that one day Academy critics will open their
> minds because we live in XXI century and we have to accept that music is
> changing. King Arthur definitely deserves an Oscar as well as The Thin Red
> Line, Gladiator, The Last Samurai and many more. Thank you Hans for making
> our world a better place to live. *****

You are mad.

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CS^TBL
(62-221-215-55.dsl.fiberworld.nl)

  In Response to:
ruzzov

  Responses to this Comment:
Amuro
Re: King Zimmer   Monday, July 26, 2004 (3:28 a.m.) 

> You are mad.

no he's not !

Imagine some instrumentmaker making a new wooden instrument that's accepted in the typical symphony orchestra. I don't think anyone has a problem with that! Now imagine that new instrument being made using synthesizers, and I'm not talking about those old Kraftwerk-sounds, I'm talking about really expressive synthesizers that 'behave' like if all tonal aspects of the sound were really controlled by humans.. Don't you think a synthesizer deserves its role in modern 'conventional' music? It's simple.. there are a few sounds a typical orchestra can't produce.. a synthesizer can!

For that reason, I'm personally never bothered by any of those typical 'Zimmer' metallic noises, beeps and soundeffects... they're just part of the whole symphony.

So, for me (and I'm sure Goldsmith had and Zimmer has the same point of view), a typical modern orchestra (esp. a filmmusic orchestra) is made-up from these groups:

- strings (incl. harp)
- brass
- woodwinds
- percussion (tuned and untuned)
- man/woman/boys/girls/mixed choir
- ethnical instruments (celtic stuff, koto, the famous duduk etc.)
- (el./ac.)guitars
- piano/harpsichord
- synthesizer(s)

..anyone a problem with that?

I've no problem with Zimmer's synths, I'm more bothered by all the Zimmer-wannabees and Zimmer-clones at Mediaventures. If you want Zimmer, hire Zimmer, not someone else.

-------
$0.02

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Amuro
(12-222-18-69.client.insightbb.com)
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  In Response to:
CS^TBL

  Responses to this Comment:
greg
Re: King Zimmer   Monday, July 26, 2004 (1:53 p.m.) 

> no he's not !

> Imagine some instrumentmaker making a new wooden instrument that's
> accepted in the typical symphony orchestra. I don't think anyone has a
> problem with that! Now imagine that new instrument being made using
> synthesizers, and I'm not talking about those old Kraftwerk-sounds, I'm
> talking about really expressive synthesizers that 'behave' like if all
> tonal aspects of the sound were really controlled by humans.. Don't you
> think a synthesizer deserves its role in modern 'conventional' music? It's
> simple.. there are a few sounds a typical orchestra can't produce.. a
> synthesizer can!

> For that reason, I'm personally never bothered by any of those typical
> 'Zimmer' metallic noises, beeps and soundeffects... they're just part of
> the whole symphony.

> So, for me (and I'm sure Goldsmith had and Zimmer has the same point of
> view), a typical modern orchestra (esp. a filmmusic orchestra) is made-up
> from these groups:

> - strings (incl. harp)
- brass
- woodwinds
- percussion (tuned
> and untuned)
- man/woman/boys/girls/mixed choir
- ethnical
> instruments (celtic stuff, koto, the famous duduk etc.)
-
> (el./ac.)guitars
- piano/harpsichord
- synthesizer(s)

> ..anyone a problem with that?

> I've no problem with Zimmer's synths, I'm more bothered by all the
> Zimmer-wannabees and Zimmer-clones at Mediaventures. If you want Zimmer,
> hire Zimmer, not someone else.

> -------
$0.02

Hmmm, when I think film score orchestra, or when I compose for a friend's film... I think this...

-Flutes
-Oboes
-Clarinets
-Basoons
-Saxes (when needed)
-Horns
-Trumpets
-Trombones
-Baritones
-Tuba
-Violin
-Viola
-cello
-double bass
-percussion
-piano
-harp

nope, no electronics there... sometimes they're useful, but not that often... In my opinion that is, I'm not denouncing Zimmer, I loved KING ARTHUR in the film, and Goldsmith's synth work is genius, I just don't think its necessary all that often.

Amuro


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greg
(63-227-252-194.chyn.qwest.net)

  In Response to:
Amuro
Your orchestra?   Monday, July 26, 2004 (2:07 p.m.) 

- brass
- woodwinds
- percussion (tuned
-
> man/woman/boys/girls/mixed choir
- ethnical
-
-
> piano/harpsichord
- synthesizer(s)
$0.02

> Hmmm, when I think film score orchestra, or when I compose for a friend's
> film... I think this...

> -Flutes
-Oboes
-Clarinets
-Basoons
-Saxes (when needed)
>
-Horns
-Trumpets
-Trombones
-Baritones
-Tuba
>
-Violin
-Viola
-cello
-double bass
-percussion
>
-piano
-harp

What? No garbage can lids smashing together? No metal rulers scraping along corrugated linolium? No slashing? No synthesized sounds of mules being fed into woodchippers? Ah well. To each his own. Lol. Just kidding!

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Neptune
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  In Response to:
ruzzov

  Responses to this Comment:
greg
Don't write your stupid comments at this site!   Monday, July 26, 2004 (12:03 p.m.) 

There are many jerks all over the world. You are one of them. Go to hell!


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greg
(63-227-252-194.chyn.qwest.net)

  In Response to:
Neptune
Funny insult   Monday, July 26, 2004 (2:09 p.m.) 

> There are many jerks all over the world. You are one of them. Go to hell!

I like this kind of frank and convoluted insult. Can't wait to use it.

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Danny2004
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  In Response to:
Neptune

  Responses to this Comment:
Neptune
Re: King Zimmer   Sunday, July 25, 2004 (11:06 p.m.) 

> Hans Zimmer once again proves that he is number one film composer in
> Hollywood. It's out of the question, my friends. Some people think that
> Zimmer is only able to compose action, synthesized music. I don't agree
> with them. I know that the best action scores were composed by Zimmer
> (Crimson Tide, The Rock, The Peacemaker) but he can make gorgeous music
> for all kinds of films. Take for example Black Hawk Down, As Good As It
> Gets or upcoming Thunderbirds. That's why the best directors dream about
> working with Hans Zimmer. I am a great fan of classical music but I don't
> see anything wrong with using synthesizers. I love Franz Schubert's piano
> sonatas and I admire "Chase", "Mutiny" and "The
> Battle" as well. I hope that one day Academy critics will open their
> minds because we live in XXI century and we have to accept that music is
> changing. King Arthur definitely deserves an Oscar as well as The Thin Red
> Line, Gladiator, The Last Samurai and many more. Thank you Hans for making
> our world a better place to live. *****

You're absolutely right about it! It has been too many times the Academy robbed Hans of what he deserves (Gladiator, Crimson Tide, The Last Samurai). There are many people who are not yet convinced of the greatness of using electronic instruments and synthesizers, even though those instruments can create greater music that an orchestra could make. That's how and why Hans Zimmer and Jerry Goldsmith (Godspeed and rest in peace, Maestro!) were not rewarded very often. Jerry Goldsmith did lots of great scores as long as I can remember, but only won 1 Oscar in 16 nominations, and he was the first to introduce synthesizers and other electronic instruments in movie scoring. I also hope Hans will get his reward very soon and so as the Academy people understand that movie scoring has changed into something better for the XXI th Century.

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Neptune
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(pc82.torun.cvx.ppp.tpnet.pl)

  In Response to:
Danny2004
Re: King Zimmer   Monday, July 26, 2004 (12:01 p.m.) 

> You're absolutely right about it! It has been too many times the Academy
> robbed Hans of what he deserves (Gladiator, Crimson Tide, The Last
> Samurai). There are many people who are not yet convinced of the greatness
> of using electronic instruments and synthesizers, even though those
> instruments can create greater music that an orchestra could make. That's
> how and why Hans Zimmer and Jerry Goldsmith (Godspeed and rest in peace,
> Maestro!) were not rewarded very often. Jerry Goldsmith did lots of great
> scores as long as I can remember, but only won 1 Oscar in 16 nominations,
> and he was the first to introduce synthesizers and other electronic
> instruments in movie scoring. I also hope Hans will get his reward very
> soon and so as the Academy people understand that movie scoring has
> changed into something better for the XXI th Century.

I totally agree with you, my friend. Electronic instruments can create greater music than orchestra. I have read one interview with Maestro in which he said exactly the same. I don't see the point of criticising Zimmer's scores because they contain electronic sounds. The most important thing are emotions. I don't buy all Zimmer's compositions because they are classical or synthesized. I buy them because I can appreciate beautiful tunes filled with emotions and feelings. Hans Zimmer is always underrated at this site because his compositions are not only classical. It's not fair. You are right that Jerry Goldsmith was the first to introduce synthesizers but you have to admit that Hans Zimmer is the only composer who integrates classical and electronic music with such an incredible beauty. The best example is Crimson Tide which is one of the best scores ever composed.

Best wishes,

Neptune


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