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Re: What is "Beowulf"?
• Posted by: James   <Send E-Mail>
• Date: Sunday, January 13, 2002, at 9:13 a.m.
• IP Address: dal-tgn-tvo-vty30.as.wcom.net
• In Response to: Re: What is "Beowulf"? (Ian)

Yeah, there isn't any visible influence to me (only thematic strands that are common in many epics) The LOTR (actually the hobbit) started as bedtime stories for Tolkiens son, only later did he write it down. I read that the LOTR was somewhat of a reaction to C.S. Lewis's stories which were loaded with christian themes and symbolism. Tolkien wanted to show that it was possible to create a strong "mythological" cycle without relying on Christian symbolism (I think it worked) I don't see any significant likenesses between Beowulf and LOTR, I don't think Tolkien intended any either.

> I don't see the resemblance (besides glancing ones) between Beowulf and
> LOTR. The heroes are completely different, the situations and enemies are
> polar, and the execution (epic poem vs. epic prose) is divergent. One
> could make the case that Tolkien was influenced by Beowulf, since he's the
> first scholar not to take it literally, but then, Beowulf is the basis for
> many of English's traditions. Somewhere I read that Tolkien's original
> idea for the books was to create a uniquely British fantasy history,
> seeing as most of their culture is imported, but instead created a whole
> new genre of fiction.




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