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Oscar noms for original score

Otis Bryant
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  Responses to this Comment:
juju-bean
Otis Bryant
Oscar noms for original score   Saturday, January 19, 2002 (10:54 p.m.) 

Some of you may object to this, but after keeping track of the Oscar race thus far, some of the best scores of the year, I'm afraid, no longer have chances for nominations. Here are my predictions thus far:

A.I. Artificial Intelligence (John Williams)
A Beautiful Mind (James Horner)
The Lord Of The Rings (Howard Shore)
Moulin Rouge (Craig Armstrong)
Mulholland Drive (Angelo Badalamenti)

These aren't definite; these are just my thoughts according to the numbers I've been keeping. My numbers have also been telling me that the most likely winner will be Howard Shore for The Lord Of The Rings. Two of the predictions are sure locks (The Lord Of The Rings, Moulin Rouge) and I still have high hopes that John Williams will get his 40th nomination. James Horner's Beautiful Mind score has been getting some pretty good buzz along with Angelo Badalamenti's work on Mulholland Drive; the thing is James Horner's score may not be strong enough to receive the nomination and Angelo Badalamenti may be overlooked due to the film's status of being an independent film.

Elliot Goldenthal's score to Final Fantasy, I'm sorry to say, never really had a chance; this is most likely due to the bad performance the film did at the box office. Another reason may be that most of the score in the film is eclipsed by the sound effects. Despite how great of a job he did, its Oscar chances were gone before it had any. Only a miracle will get it into the Oscar circle, and I'll be hoping for it.

Another person I want to talk about is Hans Zimmer. I believe he still has a chance; he earned a Golden Satellite nomination for Hannibal and a Golden Globe nomination for Pearl Harbor. If he gets a nomination, it'll be either of those two score. Then again, with the great buzz the film has been getting, his score to Black Hawk Down may come out of nowhere to get into the circle. This sort of thing has happened to him before; take 1998 for example, The Thin Red Line didn't receive any nominations from the major precursors yet it ended up receiving 7 Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture, Director, and Best Original Dramatic Score. Taking that into consideration, Black Hawk Down may have a chance, assuming that critics' claim of its effectiveness in the film are correct.

Well, I think I've said enough. These are just my thoughts; I'm not trying to turn anybody down. This is just what I think will happen in reality. Feel free to post your comments. I like it when people talk about the Oscars.

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juju-bean
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  In Response to:
Otis Bryant
Re: Oscar noms for original score   Tuesday, January 22, 2002 (5:54 p.m.) 

> Some of you may object to this, but after keeping track of the Oscar race
> thus far, some of the best scores of the year, I'm afraid, no longer have
> chances for nominations. Here are my predictions thus far:

> A.I. Artificial Intelligence (John Williams)
A Beautiful Mind (James
> Horner)
The Lord Of The Rings (Howard Shore)
Moulin Rouge (Craig
> Armstrong)
Mulholland Drive (Angelo Badalamenti)

> These aren't definite; these are just my thoughts according to the numbers
> I've been keeping. My numbers have also been telling me that the most
> likely winner will be Howard Shore for The Lord Of The Rings. Two of the
> predictions are sure locks (The Lord Of The Rings, Moulin Rouge) and I
> still have high hopes that John Williams will get his 40th nomination.
> James Horner's Beautiful Mind score has been getting some pretty good buzz
> along with Angelo Badalamenti's work on Mulholland Drive; the thing is
> James Horner's score may not be strong enough to receive the nomination
> and Angelo Badalamenti may be overlooked due to the film's status of being
> an independent film.

> Elliot Goldenthal's score to Final Fantasy, I'm sorry to say, never really
> had a chance; this is most likely due to the bad performance the film did
> at the box office. Another reason may be that most of the score in the
> film is eclipsed by the sound effects. Despite how great of a job he did,
> its Oscar chances were gone before it had any. Only a miracle will get it
> into the Oscar circle, and I'll be hoping for it.

> Another person I want to talk about is Hans Zimmer. I believe he still has
> a chance; he earned a Golden Satellite nomination for Hannibal and a
> Golden Globe nomination for Pearl Harbor. If he gets a nomination, it'll
> be either of those two score. Then again, with the great buzz the film has
> been getting, his score to Black Hawk Down may come out of nowhere to get
> into the circle. This sort of thing has happened to him before; take 1998
> for example, The Thin Red Line didn't receive any nominations from the
> major precursors yet it ended up receiving 7 Academy Award nominations,
> including Best Picture, Director, and Best Original Dramatic Score. Taking
> that into consideration, Black Hawk Down may have a chance, assuming that
> critics' claim of its effectiveness in the film are correct.

> Well, I think I've said enough. These are just my thoughts; I'm not trying
> to turn anybody down. This is just what I think will happen in reality.
> Feel free to post your comments. I like it when people talk about the
> Oscars.

I agree with your list. And I too would like to see Final Fantasy on it (one of my favorite scores of the year)... but as you said it is unlikely, due to the caliber of the movie Plus Goldenthal's style is kind of experimental... but fingers are crossed.

Well, even if FF doesn't make it, I'll be quite content if FoTR wins the oscar

BTW, Zimmer could get tossed a nomination, but I think it would be for Hannibal... As for Black Hawk Down, I haven't seen the movie and the score probably fits great, but I can't see it getting nominated: too new and bizarre...

Anyway, I'll be rooting for Shore


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Otis Bryant
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  In Response to:
Otis Bryant
Re: Oscar noms for original score   Tuesday, February 12, 2002 (3:56 p.m.) 

Well, the Oscar noms came out, and here's what they are:

A.I. Artificial Intelligence (John Williams)
A Beautiful Mind (James Horner)
Harry Potter And The Sorcerer's Stone (John Williams)
The Lord Of The Rings (Howard Shore)
Monsters, Inc. (Randy Newman)

I correctly predicted three of the five. The two I thought would be nominated but weren't were Moulin Rouge and Mulholland Drive. I knew Mulholland Drive would somehow not make it, but Moulin Rouge? It's been winning the major awards and yet it didn't get nominated. Personally, I'm kind of happy about that; it's a good score, but I think it's time to give the Oscar to the one who deserves it: Howard Shore. If by some unfortunate reason that he loses, I hope they give it to John Williams for A.I.

That's another thing. I never expected Harry Potter to get nominated. Apparently, I underestimated how good of a score it was; I apologize for doubting you, John. Congratulations on receiving your 40th and 41st nominations; four more and you'll tie Alfred Newman.

Monsters, Inc. I didn't expect either. I never thought it would come out of nowhere; it's obviously the Academy's wild card choice.

I myself have grievances for Elliot Goldenthal and Hans Zimmer never having any chance this year; they both wrote very interesting scores, although I mainly prefer their music beside John Williams'. That's right, I'm one of the few Goldenthal fans out there; I'm not saying that you're not one, but I think you got the point.

The original score battle is almost at an end. After March 24, it'll be time to look at prospective scores already released and will be released. I myself will be looking forward to Star Wars Episode II and Minority Report from John Williams, and Frida from Elliot Goldenthal. I don't know of any future releases from Hans Zimnmer, but I'll find out soon. Well, that's all I have to say. Feel free to post your comments.



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