SUPPORT FILMTRACKS! CLICK HERE FIRST:
Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk
iTunes (U.S.)
Amazon.ca
Amazon.fr
eBay (U.S.)
Amazon.de
Amazon.es
Half.com
Glisten Effect
Editorial Reviews
Scoreboard Forum
Viewer Ratings
Composers
Awards
   CURRENT MOST POPULAR REVIEWS:
         1. Gladiator
        2. Batman
       3. Nightmare Before Christmas
      4. Titanic
     5. Justice League
    6. Star Wars: The Last Jedi
   7. Harry Potter: Sorcerer's Stone
  8. Maleficent
 9. Star Wars: The Force Awakens
10. Edward Scissorhands
Home Page
Menu Options ▼
Comments about the soundtrack for Pearl Harbor (Hans Zimmer)
Critics are missing one very crucial point

Thomas
<Send E-Mail>
(ti29a81-0686.bb.online.no)


  Responses to this Comment:
ien
Don Smith
The DILinator
Felix Milbrecht
Dave
Critics are missing one very crucial point   Sunday, July 15, 2001 (7:33 a.m.) 

I was first introduced to Pearl Harbor when I saw the trailer back in June (I live in Norway). I immediately recognized Zimmer's Thin Red Line music accompanying the visuals very well. Just recently I went to the cinema, my expectations sky high. I was not let down. I will go as far as to call the theme ingenious. It includes ALL the key elements in the movie, in one single theme! I believe this theme is even better than the theme for gladiator, and I'm only happy I won't have to sit through the cd, listening to typical bombastic zimmer scoring. The orchestrations are adequate. It's kept simple. I think it's effective. Even if zimmer was given more time, I don't think he would be able to create a more effective (note "effective") score. (except maybe the japanese theme which is severly lacking in both body and power).

Like another zimmerfan pointed out, the reason why the trumpet solos are "missing" is the simple fact that there were no place for them in the movie. What little is heard (in track 9 - heart of a volunteer) is perhaps the most emotionally moving solo I've heard since "Born 4th july".

As for percussive elements, I think there's plenty and enough in the jap. track. I cringe at Zimmers typical overuse of percussion, and I was delighted to notice the absence of this in Pearl Harbor.

You are comparing Tora! Tora! Tora! and Pearl Harbor. What is that about? they are two different movies, sharing only one similarity, the story being told. I just saw Tora!x3 (two weeks before I saw Pearl Harbor) and even though the movie was thrilling, it lacked a good score. There was absolutely NO emotional content, nor is there a good theme (which I believe should be of the essence in any movie made to entertain, be it a documentary or a sci-fi movie). Zimmer's succeeds so much better in creating the right atmosphere for the movie than Jerry Goldsmith did in Tora!x3.

I very much disagree with you when you say that the score would fit right in with a movie like "Free Willy" etc. Listen to the score once more and rewrite that little embarassing line. Zimmer's theme does not only contain the emotions of one man's sadness, joy, anger, hate, love and death. It really speaks for the over 3000 men who lost their lives to no use that day, December 7th 1941.

I quote:
"Perhaps the most unbelievable mistake about the score and album is its reliance on the under-educated ears of modern audiences. Zimmer's music is not what a person would have heard in 1941. Nor is the Faith Hill song."

Pearl Harbor is NOT a documentary god damned it! It's a love story, and the directory is fully aware of the historical and technical glitches in the movie, which therefore should not be called glitches, rather "differences". The music is composed to envoke emotions in people! not to blend in as a piece in a historical puzzle. The Faith Hill song was perhaps not necessary, but it still makes for a great listen.

Where are these electronic and synthetic sounds you speak of? I have yet to hear anything but the horns in the last track and the piano (which btw shouldn't be considered electronic even in a sampled state). There aren't any traces of samples or synth patches in the fourth track that you speak of. There's the guitar, but what's electronic about that? It's a nylon guitar god damned it. Sampled or not. I for one am glad I'm spared the orchestral band scene (like that in tora! tora! tora!). I can't stand that kind of music. Besides it would probably be bashed by critics like you for looking like titanic.

I'm in awe by this terrific score. One of Zimmer's best accomplishments to date. It fits perfectly, and I can't imagine a different score in that film.

It's a LOVE STORY. You get it? L O V E S T O R Y? It's not the millenium version of Tora! Tora! Tora! and it's not supposed to be historically right. It's a blockbuster movie, and thus its main purpose is to entertain. If you want to know what really happened, go read a book on pearl harbor, or watch those documentaries on the discovery channel.

Thomas

Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


ien
<Send E-Mail>
(h24-71-26-31.vc.shawcable.net)

  In Response to:
Thomas

  Responses to this Comment:
Sean Raduechel
Why the under-developed Japanese theme is appropriate.   Tuesday, July 17, 2001 (10:06 a.m.) 

>"Even if zimmer was given more time, I don't think he would be able to create >a more effective (note "effective") score. (except maybe the japanese theme >which is severly lacking in both body and power)."

With regards to the under-developed Japanese theme.
I think it is appropriate that it lacks power and body and its under-developed (I'm NOT talking about breasts here).

All American films must follow two rules:

Rule #1: - America must win at the end of the movie, and in a glorious, patriotic, righteous manner.

Rule #2: - If rule #1 can not be satisfied, the opposition/enemy must be portrayed in an evil, devilish, shameful way. In other words they have to look bad. In an unlikely situation where victory goes to the enemy; The result must not be glorified, hence the under-developed Japanese theme.

And thats all I have to say about that!
IEN

Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


Sean Raduechel
<Send E-Mail>
(csradu469.uwsp.edu)

  In Response to:
ien
Re: Why the under-developed Japanese theme is appropriate. 8   Tuesday, December 11, 2001 (5:39 p.m.) 

> With regards to the under-developed Japanese theme.
I think it is
> appropriate that it lacks power and body and its under-developed (I'm
> NOT talking about breasts here).

To start, although it is simple and somewhat underdeveloped, it is far from lacking in power. The theme clearly is an east meets west styled theme, combining the japanese style drums, like those played by the group Kodo, and a western orchestration (which is where I feel one could start calling the piece under-developed). As far as it being appropriate, I do agree, but not for the reasons sited earlier. The japanese by nature are a fatalistic people and the theme's somewhat aggresive nature illustrates their lack of fear in the face of death. This was also an act of war, which evil or not, requires an aggressive and emotional theme.

Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


Don Smith
<Send E-Mail>
(spider-wn033.proxy.aol.com)

  In Response to:
Thomas
Re: Critics are missing one very crucial point   Tuesday, August 21, 2001 (8:21 a.m.) 

Sorry I had to erase your comment to write this response, but I didn't have any room and my computers messed up so I couldn't go to the bottom. I just wanted to say I loved your review. You said the right thing the entire time. I agree with what you said, and I quote, "It's NOT a documentray god damn it!"

YOU GO BOY!!!!!

Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


The DILinator
<Send E-Mail>
(spider-mtc-tc054.proxy.aol.com)

  In Response to:
Thomas
Re: Critics are missing one very crucial point   Friday, September 7, 2001 (2:08 p.m.) 

All I have to say to you Thomas is AMEN!!! What you said was so right, and it's a shame more people can't get that through their think heads!

David

Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


Felix Milbrecht
<Send E-Mail>
(66-44-55-171.s425.tnt1.lnhva.md.d
ialup.rcn.com)

  In Response to:
Thomas
Re: Critics are missing one very crucial point   Thursday, October 4, 2001 (6:15 a.m.) 

Hey, you are soooo right. I love the Movie and the score is just a fantastic work by Zimmer, actually one of his best up to date.


Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display


Dave
(202.123.134.184)

  In Response to:
Thomas
Re: Critics are missing one very crucial point   Monday, December 10, 2001 (2:27 p.m.) 

Hey Thomas, You are right about it. the score from Hans is a great work of art. it really has the emotional responses of many who have watched the film. I love ALL the songs. you spoke about the trumpet solo, that is evident in heart of a volunteer. that solo envokes the sorrow and pain that many of the survivors felt. When I heard that solo, I was moved by it. it is very pivitol.
Great music, good movie, great review.

Post Full Response         Edit Post         Threaded display



Copyright © 1998-2020, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast,
rewritten or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. Scoreboard created 7/24/98 and last updated 4/25/15.