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Comments about the soundtrack for Pirates of the Caribbean (Klaus Badelt and co.)

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Guess What?
• Posted by: B. Robert Tanner
• Date: Sunday, September 28, 2003, at 12:29 p.m.
• IP Address: dynamic-129-120-236-163.dynamic.unt.edu

Orchestras are going away, slow, but surely.

I've seen so many comment her about how synth sucks and orchestras rock.

Well, if you want more orchestra scores, you'd better find a way to make them stop being so expensive and get rid of the Unions around them.

Composers, quite simply, are beginning to not be able to afford orchestras anymore. We're backed into so many corners back musicians unions and such that we have to turn to technology to get our music recorded.

I use sound samples, and they work great. They aren't the best, but soon you'll have a hard time telling the difference between "real" and "fake".

Sure, I like orchestras too. But I can't use them.

Now, you're saying "It's a multi-million dollar movie, they can afford to hire one!" Not nessesarily.

It all depends on how much money was given to the music and such. I mean, Klaus has used a real orchestra before (Time Machine), so why not this time?

Money.

Let's not forget that Alan Silvestri's score for this movie was rejected because the director wanted a media ventures style score. The man who pays you the money gets to call the shots, pure and simple. It's a business.

Love the score, hate the score, whatever. But it's obviously what the director wanted, and as much as we might hate that, that's the way it works.






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