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Comments about the soundtrack for Titus (Elliot Goldenthal)
typo in the star count

Blair
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(24-56-227-188.mdmmi.voyager.net)


  Responses to this Comment:
Defrère Jérémy
typo in the star count   Saturday, July 19, 2003 (9:57 p.m.) 

In order to listen to this score, it is a requirement to see the movie. There is no other way to understand the random jazz mixed with electronic and orchestral music unless the movie is viewed. This score does what it is designed to do; to match the movie. The whole time my eyes were open, I was thinking 'What the heck?', and when I listened to the CD I thought 'What the heck?". Usually people on this site evaluate a project against their own judgment of what they like, or what the 'style' of the composer is. Truth of the matter is the score is written for the movie, and not as active listening entertainment.
When I put Winamp on random, I can tell when it lands on this score. Looking at it from a wider perspective, it starts off with a grand scale attention grabber. Succeeding is movie filler and accompaniment to what is taking place in the scene. Its fast pace, always changing, and isn't sure of its own direction. Then to conclude the roller coaster, (one of my songs out of my library) the finale just slows Everything down, takes its time, and relaxes the tension that the story tries to produce. This isn't a pirate movie, or an action thriller, or even teenage drama. Its a film score produced to aid in the emotional development of the plot, and shouldn't be taken any more than that. I don't hear one bit of any other composer in this score, nor a deviation from the overall plot of the movie...no wrong notes, enjoyable jazz sections.... so why not a 5 star?


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Defrère Jérémy
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  In Response to:
Blair

  Responses to this Comment:
Christian Clemmensen
Re: typo in the star count   Sunday, July 20, 2003 (10:55 a.m.) 

> In order to listen to this score, it is a requirement to see the movie.

Is it not the case for every other score out there as well? And while I'm at it guys, I'd like to state I'm firmly against Christian's principle of reviewing soundtracks without having seen the movie before, at least. I mean, this is completely unconceivable, as my opinion on a score is always enhanced after I've watched its film.

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Christian Clemmensen
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  In Response to:
Defrère Jérémy

  Responses to this Comment:
Mango-Man
Chris Tilton
Defrère Jérémy
...an unbelievably stupid argument...   Sunday, July 20, 2003 (12:03 p.m.) 

> Is it not the case for every other score out there as well? And while I'm
> at it guys, I'd like to state I'm firmly against Christian's principle of
> reviewing soundtracks without having seen the movie before, at least. I
> mean, this is completely unconceivable, as my opinion on a score is always
> enhanced after I've watched its film.

First of all, there was no "typo" in the star count. It's called an opinion, not an error.

Second, the quoted statement above is nuts, because it is an impossible ideal. I receive upwards of a dozen albums per week to review. Many of them are for films that aren't going to be released for another month. What the hell am I supposed to do with all of those albums? Sit on them? Spend $60 a week watching all of the films? When would I have time to actually write the review?

I have a hard time believing that people like you guys would actually prefer that I write nothing about all of these albums... Of course it's beneficial to see the films, but it's just not possible.

It's a ridiculous misunderstanding about how things work, and it's a stupid argument to use against the reviews.

Unbelievable...

Christian


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Mango-Man
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  In Response to:
Christian Clemmensen

  Responses to this Comment:
Narendur
Re: YOU are a unbelievably stupid REVIEWER, grow up and get a life!!   Sunday, July 20, 2003 (3:04 p.m.) 

> First of all, there was no "typo" in the star count. It's called
> an opinion, not an error.

NO, your opinions ARE errors. How can you not see the beauty of TITUS?? Maybe its because you hate everything Eliot Goldenthal does and you think he is a hack! You are the unbeleivably stupid person here and I think you should be banned from reviewing anymore Goldenthal filmscores!



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Narendur
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  In Response to:
Mango-Man
Could you PLEASE do us all a favor and jump of the next cliff? Thanks. *NM*   Monday, July 21, 2003 (9:14 a.m.) 



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Chris Tilton
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  In Response to:
Christian Clemmensen

  Responses to this Comment:
Isaac Engelhorn
Re: indeed, also...   Sunday, July 20, 2003 (9:09 p.m.) 

While I of course completely disagree with your Titus review, I am in complete agreement with your point, and I'd also like to add to it. CD soundtracks are released so that one may purchase and listen to. If it doesn't work without the film, then what is the point of purchasing the CD? That's what this site is for, to review the CD to judge whether or not they feel it is worth purchasing. It doesn't matter how it works, or doesn't work, in the film. What matters is how it works on album, because that is what is being reviewed. This is a SOUNDTRACK site, not a site with reviews on the context of how a score works in a film. If only people would just understand that simple concept.

It's also embarassing that a review such as yours, well articulated, and expressing a point of view, is met with such idiotic criticism. I don't agree with your review either, but all these morons on this comment area are giving us Goldenthal fans a bad name. Shame on them!

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Isaac Engelhorn
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om)

  In Response to:
Chris Tilton
tell me about it...   Monday, July 21, 2003 (1:52 p.m.) 

> It's also embarassing that a review such as yours, well articulated, and
> expressing a point of view, is met with such idiotic criticism. I don't
> agree with your review either, but all these morons on this comment area
> are giving us Goldenthal fans a bad name. Shame on them!

It's ironic though, that if you applied the basis of Christian's review to the movie instead of the soundtrack, I'd agree completely.

Isaac

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Defrère Jérémy
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  In Response to:
Christian Clemmensen
Re: ...an unbelievably stupid argument...   Friday, August 1, 2003 (10:29 a.m.) 

> First of all, there was no "typo" in the star count. It's called an opinion, > not an error.

Agree. Absolutely nothing to add about that. While I'm at it, I want to apologize to you when I said your opinion on Titus was downright wrong. It was stupid, I admit that. But, you know, we're only humans, and sometimes, well..., we just do and say crazy sh*t that we didn't think. Everyone has his/her own opinion, and we hafta respect that, whether that opinion is negative or positive.

> Second, the quoted statement above is nuts, because it is an impossible
> ideal. I receive upwards of a dozen albums per week to review. Many of
> them are for films that aren't going to be released for another month.
> What the hell am I supposed to do with all of those albums? Sit on them?
> Spend $60 a week watching all of the films? When would I have time to
> actually write the review?

The fact that you receive upwards of a dozen albums per week to review is none of my business, Christian. All I know is that it must be one hell of a job, and we're all thankful for that. Listen, what I care about is that you tend to forget there's also a movie behind the music. I just want you to always bear that in mind while reviewing your soundtracks, OK? No offense intended, of course.

> I have a hard time believing that people like you guys would actually
> prefer that I write nothing about all of these albums... Of course it's
> beneficial to see the films, but it's just not possible.

Just for you to know, film music composers don't write music for air or to make good albums on CDs (these are secondary things, IMO, even though the CD is for us, film music fans, our guilty pleasure), they do write it in order to accompany the images of the film. Just in case it's not very clear. Now feel free to consider my argument as stupid as you want, but I don't believe it's possible to review a score if you haven't, at least, seen the movie that goes with it.

> It's a ridiculous misunderstanding about how things work, and it's a
> stupid argument to use against the reviews.

Oh, y'know, there are lots of stupid things in this world, and all we can do is either notice them and shut up or notice them and despise/regret them.

> Unbelievable...

Ditto.

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