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Comments about the soundtrack for Windtalkers (James Horner)

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Re: question
• Posted by: Sean Raduechel   <Send E-Mail>
• Date: Sunday, May 12, 2002, at 6:58 p.m.
• IP Address: csradu469.uwsp.edu
• In Response to: I don't understand (Dan Sartori)

> The reviewer talks about the possibility of Windtalkers being a strong
> four-star score if he had included more ethnic native American elements.
> Quick question: why is it that we limit Horner and other composers to four
> stars while we just assume that every Williams score is going to be five
> unless some reason arises for it to be taken down? That really bothers me.
> It seems that people on this site have a very obvious bias to John
> Williams's music and don't really consider it possible that anyone else
> can create a masterpiece. I mean, think about it, every Star Wars
> soundtrack will be given 5 stars, no matter how much of a confused jumble
> of themes it is. I guarantee you Episode 3 will get 5 stars, even if it
> sounds like it was written by my little sister, simply because John
> Williams name is on the CD. I don't hate John Williams, I just hate how
> many breaks we give him. It seems very unfair to me.

I think that it should also be recognized that this is not a solely Native American story. It takes place during world war two. This is essentially the issue facing Horner, how does one compose for a war movie and successfully institute a native american feel. Now, I have yet to hear the whole score, so I cannot assess it fully, but my point is that we should not reason that this score is not worth the full four stars just because it isn't completely native american.




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