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Re: Potential score disappointments for the rest of 2022
• Posted by: jjstarA113   <Send E-Mail>
• Date: Wednesday, June 29, 2022, at 7:42 a.m.
• IP Address: cpe-098-122-129-059.nc.res.rr.com
• In Response to: Re: Potential score disappointments for the re... (Ramón)

> Not to be pedantic (though actually yeah, to be a bit pedantic), but Puss
> in Boots isn't influenced by Latino music in any way whatsoever. Puss in
> Boots has always been portrayed (and scored) as an overtly Spanish
> character.

> I say it because I know that people draw the Latino connection, Mexican
> specifically, because of Horner's Zorro scores, but those scores don't
> have anything Mexican in them either. All the cultural influences in them
> are Spanish (which is somehow the worst possible way to score a Mexican
> character, but that's a different conversation).

Yes, thanks for the clarification! I’m admittedly rather confused on this subject, so I tried to do a little snooping on the influences and the terminology I should use before posting. The character of Puss in the Shrek universe was of course based on Zorro, a Mexican character who was twice played by Spanish actor Banderas, a problematic decision to say the least (even though I do love that first Zorro movie). I also learned that the world of the Puss in Boots spin-off film, according to executive producer Guillermo del Toro, was an amalgam of Mexico and Spain.

Finally, I found a Wiki page for “Latin music”, a vague, catch-all genre for music originating from Spain, Latin America, Portugal, and the US. (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Latin_music). So I figured that was the correct word for the vaguely-defined world of Puss in Boots, as well as the musical domain in which Chicana composer Germaine Franco would likely be called for, as she’s worked on a number of Latin America-based films spanning from Mexico to throughout South America (and is famously adept at getting the specificities of these cultures right depending on the project). However, I understand how the term “Latin music” just flattens all these various, distinct cultures - some of which oceans apart - into one big slurry of stereotypes, and I’m far too uneducated in these cultures to properly parse all of it. sickening




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