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  Fascinating use of film music in Hezbollah propaganda film  
 
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• Posted by Christian Clemmensen
• Date: Monday, July 31, 2006, at 5:56 p.m.
• IP Address: bushisacriminal.filmtracks.com


One of the joys of satellite television is the ability to watch practically any channel from anywhere in the world. The channel package at work seemingly includes damn near every channel in existence across the globe, and I enjoy hassling some of my rodeo-inclined, homophobic, culturally inept co-workers in the lunch room by switching the channel to Melody Arabia or one of the Arabic news stations while I eat. There's one such news station that broadcasts sometimes in English, which obviously helps us Montanans follow along, and today I was interested to see the partial broadcast of a Hezbollah propaganda piece on that channel. Their message was simple: the Zionists are causing mass suffering and are killing innocent Muslims, etc, etc. Same old rhetoric. Hearing the other guys try to figure out the technical difference between a "Zionist," a "Hebrew," and an "Infidel" is extremely entertaining (they once confused a "Klingon" with a "Mexican" when the receiver got stuck on one of Spike TV's Trek marathons last year). But here's what startled me: this Hezbollah propaganda video was remarkably sophisticated, and for two separate scenes of civilian suffering, they used Brian Transeau's score for Stealth for additional emotional punch. Specifically, they used the two tracks with wailing female vocals (16 and 28). The irony, of course, is that the original film is about the sacrifice of a self-aware piece of American war technology and here it was twisted to serve the purpose of an American adversary. They did choose the only two really good cues from the score; both are quite beautiful in their mournful vocals. I'm sure BT didn't get paid his royalties on that one...

Also: I'm still fixing bugs in this new board that'll debut tomorrow. One fix of the guestbook viewing format now allows the entire Marxist Oboe thread to be viewed on one long page... perfect for those of you who want to archive the monster.

Christian




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