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Drop Zone
(1994)
Album Cover Art
Composed, Co-Orchestrated, and Co-Produced by:

Co-Orchestrated and Additional Music by:
Nick Glennie-Smith

Co-Orchestrated by:
Ryeland Allison

Vocal Solos by:
Rose Stone

Co-Produced by:
Jay Rifkin
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LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Varèse Sarabande
(December 20th, 1994)
Availability Icon
ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
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ALSO SEE




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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you have always loved Hans Zimmer's hyperactive action style in its most relentlessly abrasive form, Drop Zone being among the pioneers in defining such barrages of synthetic force.

Avoid it... if the grating sound of Zimmer's earlier generation of synthetic samples and dry keyboarding in accelerated rhythms, with no really substantial breaks for harmonious thematic interludes of lesser volume, is nothing more than an invitation for a headache.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,631
WRITTEN 3/16/10
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Zimmer
Zimmer
Drop Zone: (Hans Zimmer) There was a sudden rash of action movies combining skydiving and crime in the early 1990's, though 1994's Drop Zone has two characteristics by which it distinguishes itself. First, it was arguably the biggest mainstream offering of the topic by a major studio, much of its $45 million budget earmarked for Steven Seagal before he was replaced in the lead role by Wesley Snipes. Secondly, all three stars of Drop Zone (Snipes, Gary Busey, and Yancy Butler) were destined for the embarrassment of legal troubles, eventually arrested for a variety of accusations (including tax evasion, spousal abuse, and disorderly intoxication). The criminals on screen in the film are led by Busey's former DEA agent, who plots to skydive onto his former agency from far above Washington D.C. and bring with him a top flight computer hacker he breaks free from a transfer aboard a commercial airliner. It's up to Snipes' U.S. marshal and Butler's skydiving trainer to foil the plot and avenge the killing of the marshal's brother in the earlier jailbreak. With no interracial romance or spectacular technology on display, Drop Zone was really nothing more than a standard crime drama with an extra perk for skydiving fans. A few memorable elements did result from the film, however, including the inspiration for a drop tower ride at Paramount's amusement parks later in the decade and a popular score by emerging action score star Hans Zimmer. In the era before the Media Ventures organization's streamlining of rock and synthesizer-defined scores for this genre of movies, Zimmer was collaborating with a few of his earliest cohorts in this arena to shape the coming stereotypes of the "blockbuster sound." These techniques ranged from the use of synthetic sampling and manipulation of orchestral textures to the expansion of the bass region to inject the music into a realm previously reserved for only sound effects editors. Among the first scores specifically designed to rattle the floors was Drop Zone, an almost completely electronic work with only a few live elements thrown into a hyperactive mix of keyboarded samples and drum pads. Its personality is guided by the electric guitar solos that had existed in Zimmer scores like K2, but never with such ferocious zeal exhibited in their super-cool (and occasionally wild) performances. The resulting score is a favorite for many veteran Zimmer collectors, buoyed by its obvious placement in the trailers for several high profile films in the following ten years. In retrospect, it was in many ways a substantial preview of subsequent blockbuster scores from the composer and his associates.

Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
111 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 2.9 Stars
***** 18 5 Stars
**** 25 4 Stars
*** 23 3 Stars
** 18 2 Stars
* 27 1 Stars
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COMMENTS
1 TOTAL COMMENTS
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'Too many notes...
Hasta - June 16, 2011, at 6:09 a.m.
1 comment  (592 views)
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Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
Total Time: 37:18
• 1. Drop Zone (1:45)
• 2. Hyphopera* (1:41)
• 3. Hi Jack (4:35)
• 4. Terry's Dropped Out (1:01)
• 5. Flashback & Fries** (4:21)
• 6. Miami Jump (5:14)
• 7. Too Many Notes - Not Enough Rests (10:39)
• 8. After the Dub (8:07)
* composed by Ryeland Allison and performed by Randelle K. Stainback
** composed by Nick Glennie-Smith

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes a note from the director about working with Zimmer.
Copyright © 2010-2015, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from Drop Zone are Copyright © 1994, Varèse Sarabande and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 3/16/10 (and not updated significantly since).
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