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Twilight Zone: The Movie
(1983)
Album Cover Art
2000 Warner
2009 FSM
Album 2 Cover Art
Composed and Conducted by:

Orchestrated by:
Arthur Morton

Albums Produced by:
Bruce Botnick
Lukas Kendall
Mike Matessino
Labels Icon
LABELS & RELEASE DATES
Warner Brothers
(2000)

Film Score Monthly
(April 14th, 2009)
Availability Icon
ALBUM AVAILABILITY
The 2000 Warner album was a regular commercial release but is long out of print. The 2009 Film Score Monthly album is a limited to 3,000 copies and available through soundtrack specialty outlets for $20.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you seek twenty minutes of truly lovely Jerry Goldsmith material for light and airy melodic situations, a sound that betrays the reputation that this score has with some listeners because of its generally darker whole.

Avoid it... if you distinctly remember the chopping rhythms and ominous brass theme for the memorable airplane segment that concludes the film and expect to hear more than just a few minutes of that impressively harrowing material.
Review Icon
EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,485
WRITTEN 7/16/09
Goldsmith
Goldsmith
Twilight Zone: The Movie: (Jerry Goldsmith) Much time had passed since the 1959 debut of Rod Serling's "The Twilight Zone" on television by the time Warner Brothers finally kicked the production of a feature film into gear. Despite Serling's death in 1975, there was a revival of interest in the concept in subsequent years, leading to a cult phenomenon complete with its own magazine. The format of Twilight Zone: The Movie came under much consideration in the early 1980's, and director-turned-producer Steven Spielberg took control of the production and struck a balance between the artistic freedoms of the directors he hired for the project and Warner Brother's own inclinations. The resulting film consisted of four parts that served as mini-episodes, with links between characters in each episode drawing the four disparate stories into one overarching universe. Ultimately, Twilight Zone: The Movie wasn't quite as tightly woven as Spielberg would have liked, but the film was destined to be greeted by audiences that preferred one segment over another (much like the "Amazing Stories" series on television that was a direct descendant of Twilight Zone: The Movie). The film performed modestly well, but it failed to really enthrall audiences as expected until George Miller's fourth and final installment. The production also had to contend with the high profile death of three actors, including star Vic Morrow, during the filming of a helicopter sequence in the first episode. Still, one of the aspects of Twilight Zone: The Movie that the production definitely had going in its favor was its loyalty to the television show. Spielberg was careful to incorporate Serling and other familiar elements into the film, and this nostalgia factor led to the hiring of Jerry Goldsmith to handle the scoring duties for all four segments of the film. Not only had Goldsmith been nominated for an Academy Award for the music for Spielberg's production of Poltergeist just prior to his work on Twilight Zone: The Movie (the director/producer often mused about wanting to collaborate more with Goldsmith despite his partnership with John Williams for his own films), but he had also written a fair amount of creative material with limited instrumentation for the original television show. Additionally, Goldsmith's extremely popular score for Star Trek: The Motion Picture had proven his ability to translate a televised science fiction concept into a larger on-screen orchestral presence.

Ratings Icon
VIEWER RATINGS
272 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 3.75 Stars
***** 108 5 Stars
**** 58 4 Stars
*** 52 3 Stars
** 38 2 Stars
* 16 1 Stars
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Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
2000 Warner Album Tracks   ▼Total Time: 45:01
• 1. Twilight Zone Main Title - composed by Marius Constant (0:42)
• 2. Overture (5:13)
• 3. Time Out (6:45)
• 4. Kick the Can (10:12)
• 5. Nights Are Forever - performed by Jennifer Warner (3:39)
• 6. It's a Good Life (10:52)
• 7. Nightmare at 20,000 Feet (6:53)
• 8. Twilight Zone End Title - composed by Marius Constant (0:45)
2009 Film Score Monthly Album Tracks   ▼Total Time: 78:57

Notes Icon
NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert of the 2009 FSM album contains extensive information about the score and film.
Copyright © 2009-2015, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from Twilight Zone: The Movie are Copyright © 2000, 2009, Warner Brothers, Film Score Monthly and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 7/16/09 (and not updated significantly since).
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