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The Trial of the Chicago 7
(2020)
Album Cover Art
Composed and Produced by:
Daniel Pemberton

Co-Orchestrated and Conducted by:
Andrew Skeet
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LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Varèse Sarabande
(October 8th, 2020)
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ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release, with both CD and vinyl options.
Awards
AWARDS
The song "Hear My Voice" was nominated for an Academy Award and a Golden Globe.
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ALSO SEE





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Availability | Awards | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... as an admirable souvenir from the film, for Daniel Pemberton's highly discordant but intelligent work requires more context than most film scores to appreciate its wild emotional swings.

Avoid it... on the album without tapering your expectations for the score, the dramatic finale and soulful vocals not representative of the aggressive rock and tense courtroom ambience occupying most of the work.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,984
WRITTEN 2/22/21
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The Trial of the Chicago 7: (Daniel Pemberton) Originally meant to be helmed by Steven Spielberg, 2020's The Trial of the Chicago 7 was ultimately directed by writer Aaron Sorkin to much acclaim. The plot is just one of many to have detailed the plight of the Chicago Seven group of anti-Vietnam War protesters charged by the government with conspiring to participate and then actively fighting in the riots at the 1968 National Democratic Convention. The film switches between the events leading up to and including the riots and the tense courtroom scenes that eventually lead to salvation for the group of young men and their attorneys. The film, augmented by Frank Langella's performance as the unforgiving and angry judge presiding over the case, offers an extraordinarily sympathetic viewpoint to the men charged. Though the movie's release was upended by the 2020 pandemic, it still managed to draw significant awards consideration, especially for Sacha Baron Cohen's impressively serious performance as a group member. Composer Daniel Pemberton had provided highly variable music for Sorkin's Steve Jobs and Molly's Game over the previous five years, and the recording of the score for The Trial of the Chicago 7 proved to be a huge logistical challenge given that lockdowns in 2020 prevented Pemberton from assembling the needed ensemble for recordings. Fortunately, the United Kingdom opened up long enough for up to 40 string players to record their part, and the remainder could be handled in jam sessions for percussion, piano, guitars, and a few others. The spirit of the music for The Trial of the Chicago 7 was set very clearly by Sorkin for one of the three general styles that inhabit the score. The movie has three totally distinct emotional variants it espouses in its scenes, led by the flashbacks to the day of the riots, which is the portion that Sorkin dictated to minute details in Pemberton's work. Then there are the scenes involving the courtroom drama and, in something of a combination of both, the moments of soul-searching hope in the story that required the infusion of a vocalist, 26-year-old British artist Celeste. The extreme juxtaposition between the styles of these three personalities in the score presented Pemberton with a significant problem in tying them together in a cohesive whole, and while he acquits himself quite well in how the score plays in the film, the album experience remains a discordant challenge. Few scores are as totally dependent upon the context of the narrative as this one.


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VIEWER RATINGS
88 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 3.04 Stars
***** 13 5 Stars
**** 21 4 Stars
*** 23 3 Stars
** 19 2 Stars
* 12 1 Stars
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Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS
Total Time: 53:35
• 1. Hear My Dream - performed by Celeste (1:25)
• 2. We're Going to Chicago (6:17)
• 3. The Trial (4:38)
• 4. Conspiracy Office (1:12)
• 5. My Life (1:33)
• 6. Sequestering the Jury (1:18)
• 7. Meet the Police (0:52)
• 8. Take the Hill (6:14)
• 9. Riot Aftermath (1:40)
• 10. Don't Stand (2:19)
• 11. Star Witness (2:31)
• 12. Motion Denied (3:30)
• 13. Blood on the Streets (7:01)
• 14. Trial Day 151 (3:11)
• 15. Stand Up (The Chicago 7) (3:41)
• 16. Hear My Voice - performed by Celeste (3:05)
• 17. Take the Hill (Hear My Screams) - performed by Celeste (3:19)

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NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes no extra information about the score or film.
Copyright © 2021, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from The Trial of the Chicago 7 are Copyright © 2020, Varèse Sarabande and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 2/22/21 (and not updated significantly since).
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