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1917
(2019)
Album Cover Art
Composed, Conducted, and Co-Produced by:

Orchestrated by:
J.A.C. Redford

Co-Produced by:
Bill Bernstein
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LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Sony Classical
(December 11th, 2019)
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ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Regular U.S. release. Also available on vinyl.
Awards
AWARDS
Nominated for an Academy Award, BAFTA Award, Golden Globe, and a Grammy Award.
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ALSO SEE





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Availability | Awards | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you are willing to tolerate a substantial mass of obnoxious, gloomy atmosphere to reveal a handful of sublimely dramatic, symphonic cues from Thomas Newman.

Avoid it... if your heart breaks at the thought of hearing Newman emulate Hans Zimmer in the war genre, the connections here unmistakable and distracting.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,952
WRITTEN 10/11/20
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Newman
Newman
1917: (Thomas Newman) In reality, the loss of 1,600 British men in an all-fated attack on German lines in World War I would have yielded indifference from the British commanders. But that doesn't make for compelling storytelling, so writer and director Sam Mendes concocted a scenario in April 1917 in which the Germans retreated to fortified lines as a means of luring those 1,600 British soldiers into a trap, all the while a pair of British men attempt to relay a stop order to those advancing units by traversing some of the most dangerous territory in the war. One of the two soldiers braving this desperate journey will likely lose his brother amongst those 1,600 if the attack is not cancelled, enhancing the drama. The bittersweet tale is less a commentary on war as it is, as per usual for highly acclaimed war films, an examination of the human spirit. In the case of 1917, however, Mendes took the concept a step further by presenting the movie as though it was filmed in one continuous shot. In no small part due to this compelling and spectacular method of conveyance, 1917 received widespread critical acclaim, significant box office response, and a variety of mainstream awards. The film represented the seventh collaboration between Mendes and composer Thomas Newman, whose music in their films together has often garnered respect and awards nominations. The veteran composer openly stated that 1917 was likely the most challenging of these projects to date, in part because the one-shot aspect of the film did not allow for traditional cue breaks. As a result, the spotting of the score in the film was left to ebb and flow depending on the emotional needs of a particular shot, and while Mendes originally sought to include only about an hour of music, Newman's contribution eventually swelled to 95 minutes. The director instructed him to avoid constant gloominess and the cliches of war films, instead opting to use music to span a range of extreme emotions from moment to moment. Undoubtedly, Hans Zimmer lurks over this score with an immense shadow, his approach to The Thin Red Line and Dunkirk proving unshakable. The former score bleeds through in both the methodology of Newman's writing and in literal temp-track emulation. The latter informs the gruesome sound design that is commonly accepted as a tool of suspense in the war genre of this era.



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VIEWER RATINGS
100 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 3.21 Stars
***** 15 5 Stars
**** 27 4 Stars
*** 31 3 Stars
** 18 2 Stars
* 9 1 Stars
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Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS
Total Time: 77:07
• 1. 1917 (1:17)
• 2. Up the Down Trench (6:19)
• 3. Gehenna (3:34)
• 4. A Scrap of Ribbon (6:29)
• 5. The Night Window (3:41)
• 6. The Boche (3:21)
• 7. Tripwire (1:40)
• 8. A Bit of Tin (2:02)
• 9. Lockhouse (4:04)
• 10. Blake and Schofield (4:20)
• 11. Milk (10:10)
• 12. Ecoust-Saint-Mein (2:36)
• 13. Les Arbres (3:36)
• 14. Englander (4:29)
• 15. The Rapids (1:29)
• 16. Croisilles Wood (2:06)
• 17. Sixteen Hundred Men (6:32)
• 18. Mentions in Dispatches (3:44)
• 19. Come Back to Us (5:39)

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NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert includes no information about the score or film and fails to provide the standard, basic level of production credits for the recording.
Copyright © 2020, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from 1917 are Copyright © 2019, Sony Classical and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 10/11/20 (and not updated significantly since).
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