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The Invisible Man
(2020)
Album Cover Art
Composed and Produced by:
Benjamin Wallfisch

Conducted by:
Christopher Egan

Orchestrated by:
David Krystal
Labels Icon
LABEL & RELEASE DATE
Back Lot Music
(February 21st, 2020)
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ALBUM AVAILABILITY
Commercial digital release, with a vinyl option available.
Awards
AWARDS
None.
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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... for Benjamin Wallfisch's hypnotically gorgeous suspense material for piano and lushly mixed strings, the rapturous finale a magnificent expression of triumph.

Avoid it... if these attractive moments cannot transcend the truly awful electronic and marginally effective filler material in the score, the two halves of the work too incongruous to function together.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,954
WRITTEN 1/2/21
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The Invisible Man: (Benjamin Wallfisch) As part of Universal Pictures' resurrection of the classic monster movies, 2020's The Invisible Man abandons the studio's original intent to directly connect the narratives of their properties and instead treat them as individual stories. In this case, the concept of H. G. Wells' 1897 tale is twisted into a contemporary technological realm, replacing the chemical origins of the titular character's capabilities with an optically enhanced body suit that can render anyone in it invisible. It's a cheap modernization to force a classic idea into the slasher movie genre, the supposed protagonist revealed to be just as sick as the invisible man and leaving her own trail of blood by the end. Perhaps this diminishment should not be unexpected, as writer and director Leigh Whannell was an original conjurer of the grotesque Saw franchise. While critics and audiences rewarded the film well in the weeks prior to 2020's pandemic shutdown of theatres, The Invisible Man is a film that lacks any more elegance than the typical psychological murder thriller involving a scared woman and demented ex-partner. No stranger to both the horror and thriller genres is composer Benjamin Wallfisch, whose work in this area has tended to stray towards the dramatism that Christopher Young often infused into equivalent projects of the 1990's. While the young woman targeted by the invisible man in this story is not without her own homicidal tendencies, the film does attempt to treat her as a genuine heroine, and Wallfisch approached her as such as well. The composer supplies her a pained and tortured but romantic musical persona throughout the story, using the score to anchor her sanity. The most important aspect of the music for The Invisible Man is its relative brevity; Wallfisch thankfully left several scenes unscored at the behest of Whannell, and those moments benefit greatly from that choice. The music can be divided into three extremely distinct parts: the largely tonal string orchestra representing the heroine, the hyper-aggressive synthetic tones and manipulation for her ex-partner in the invisibility suit, and the more generic suspense material for both elements during mostly the film's middle third. The score as a whole is extraordinarily disjointed, content to convey two totally disparate sounds for good and evil without any truly effective merging of those halves, even when the suspense portions attempt to apply manipulation effects to the string orchestra.


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VIEWER RATINGS
85 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 2.7 Stars
***** 9 5 Stars
**** 14 4 Stars
*** 22 3 Stars
** 23 2 Stars
* 17 1 Stars
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COMMENTS
2 TOTAL COMMENTS
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Clemmensen overrates Wallfisch   Expand >>
Allen - January 10, 2021, at 8:18 p.m.
2 comments  (169 views)
Newest: January 11, 2021, at 1:03 a.m. by
Philipp
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Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS
Total Time: 49:32
• 1. Cobolt (1:42)
• 2. Escape (4:28)
• 3. He's Gone (3:37)
• 4. This is What He Does (2:19)
• 5. We've Got That in Common (1:21)
• 6. Make It Rain (2:22)
• 7. Attack (2:46)
• 8. Why Me (3:00)
• 9. The Suit (2:15)
• 10. Asylum (3:31)
• 11. He's Behind You (4:42)
• 12. House Fight (5:34)
• 13. It's All a Lie (5:26)
• 14. Surprise (1:32)
• 15. Denouement (4:57)

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NOTES AND QUOTES
There exists no official packaging for this album.
Copyright © 2021, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
The reviews and other textual content contained on the filmtracks.com site may not be published, broadcast, rewritten
or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from The Invisible Man are Copyright © 2020, Back Lot Music and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 1/2/21 (and not updated significantly since).
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