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T-Rex: Back to the Cretaceous
(1998)
Album Cover Art
Composed, Orchestrated, Conducted, and Produced by:
William Ross
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LABELS & RELEASE DATES
Promotional
(1998)

Dragon's Domain Records
(December 5th, 2020)
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ALBUM AVAILABILITY
The 1998 album was a rare promotional release by the composer, initially available through soundtrack specialty outlets for $20. The 2020 Dragon's Domain album is limited to 500 copies and debuted for $16 at those same outlets.
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   Availability | Viewer Ratings | Comments | Audio & Track Listings | Notes
Buy it... if you were among the very few people who appreciated William Ross' score in the context of the putrid IMAX film, the music predictably workmanlike but better than expected.

Avoid it... if you expect highly original themes and instrumental styles from the career orchestrator, neither of which demanded of Ross for this humorously poor project.
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EDITORIAL REVIEW
FILMTRACKS TRAFFIC RANK: #1,662
WRITTEN 2/29/00, REVISED 4/28/21
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2020 Album

Ross
Ross
T-Rex: Back to the Cretaceous: (William Ross) The popularity of Jurassic Park and the relative availability of special effect techniques that could bring dinosaurs to life were responsible for a variety of Jurassic-oriented films in the mid-1990's. One such entry was the short IMAX film T-Rex: Back to the Cretaceous, released in 1998 to the super large American screens in 3D format. Unfortunately, Brett Leonard's production had very little going for it. Of its 44-minute running time, the advertised dinosaurs are only on screen for a precious few minutes, which alone is enough to annoy any impatient parent. The script instead spends its first half exploring the very poorly acted relationship between a teenage girl and her father, who conveniently happens to be a paleontologist. When suffering parents go to a short IMAX film, family problems aren't what they want to see, and it's a relief when the girl accidentally breaks a tyrannosaurus rex egg, a cloud of smoke magically appears, and she's transported back in time to be chased by the 15-ton monster. Sadly, she eludes the beast. On the whole, the film was derided by critics for not delivering on the goods, even in the special effects department, where the rendering of the creatures isn't as sharp as in the competition. It's hard to imagine that any composer would turn down the opportunity to score another IMAX picture, because they so often utilize the grandest of orchestral soundtracks. For career orchestrator William Ross, such projects were his outlet for his own compositional efforts, and T-Rex: Back to the Cretaceous represented a pretty typical outing. Known mostly at the time for his orchestration of some of composer Alan Silvestri's best scores, Ross doesn't surprise anyone when he writes material that sounds generally similar to those works. In the case of T-Rex: Back to the Cretaceous, though, the other elements of the production are so awful that you can't fault him for providing largely derivative music. While it would have been nice to hear a true adventure score in this circumstance, Ross was bound by the script to write mostly pleasant conversational pieces for the troubled relationship between the girl and her father. With that in mind, the listening experience of T-Rex: Back to the Cretaceous on album sells itself just as short as the film on the whole. Still, there is a significant amount of strong material here to please any of the rare collectors of Ross' usually strong work.


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VIEWER RATINGS
210 TOTAL VOTES
Average: 3.22 Stars
***** 45 5 Stars
**** 50 4 Stars
*** 48 3 Stars
** 41 2 Stars
* 26 1 Stars
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Filmtracks Sponsored Donated Review
James Delphi - September 21, 2008, at 6:37 p.m.
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Track Listings Icon
TRACK LISTINGS AND AUDIO
Audio Samples   ▼
All Albums Tracks   ▼Total Time: 37:12
• 1. Main Title (3:33)
• 2. Ally (1:27)
• 3. Liz Falls (1:57)
• 4. Finding the Egg (1:55)
• 5. Ally and Dad (3:00)
• 6. Journey to the Cretaceous (5:39)
• 7. Meeting Charles Knight (2:06)
• 8. Kiss and a Squeeze (2:02)
• 9. Meeting Barnum Brown (4:42)
• 10. Meeting T-Rex (6:45)
• 11. Finale (4:02)

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NOTES AND QUOTES
The insert of the 1998 promotional album contains artwork from the film but no information about the score of film. That of the 2020 Dragon's Domain album contains basic information.
Copyright © 2000-2021, Filmtracks Publications. All rights reserved.
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or redistributed without the prior written authority of Christian Clemmensen at Filmtracks Publications. All artwork and sound clips from T-Rex: Back to the Cretaceous are Copyright © 1998, 2020, Promotional, Dragon's Domain Records and cannot be redistributed without the label's expressed written consent. Page created 2/29/00 and last updated 4/28/21.
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